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Se puede llamar Estado de Puerto Rico y las Islas Virgenes, y ser conocido como Puerto Rico, algo asi como Rhode Island que su nombre oficial es Rhode Island and the Providence Plantations
 

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Ellos dependen mucho de nosotros para importar agua potable, ya que no tienen ningun tipo de "water source'. Creo que hace poco habian negociaciones para venderle energia electrica tambien.
 

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Se puede llamar Estado de Puerto Rico y las Islas Virgenes, y ser conocido como Puerto Rico, algo asi como Rhode Island que su nombre oficial es Rhode Island and the Providence Plantations
O como Hawaii que es el nombre del estado y de la isla grande de ellos.
 

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¿Y cómo sería si ocurriera lo opuesto? En caso de que la gente de las Islas Vírgenes se interese en unirse a un Puerto Rico independiente, una posibilidad es constituir un Estado multinacional--digamos, como lo son Rusia (tiene provincias, ciudades federales y repúblicas autónomas) o el Reino Unido (cuatro naciones constituyentes). De lo contrario seríamos cada quien por su lado.
 

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Eso lo veo bien improbable por la influencia mucho mayor que tiene Puerto Rico. Ahora, sí cabe dicha posibilidad, al menos en el caso de anexión: Islas Vírgenes es incorporado (sí es parte de EE. UU.) contrario a Puerto Rico (no incorporado, por lo tanto no es parte de EE. UU.).
 

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Las USVI son un territorio organizado y no incorporado como es Puerto Rico, Guam y las Islas Marianas del Norte. (Samoa Americana es no incorporado y no organizado)

El unico territorio incorporado es Atolón Palmyra en el Pacifico. Ahi no vive nadie.
 

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Las USVI son un territorio organizado y no incorporado como es Puerto Rico, Guam y las Islas Marianas del Norte. (Samoa Americana es no incorporado y no organizado)

El unico territorio incorporado es Atolón Palmyra en el Pacifico. Ahi no vive nadie.
Exacto. De momento me perdi con lo que dijo Lucario. Kimmy tiene razon.
 

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Veo tantas diferencias entre Puerto Rico y las Islas Virgenes, no creo que sea buena idea. Habrian muchas diferencias entre ambos sobre muchisimos temas.
 

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Ningún territorio con identidad como lo es USVI va querer desaparecer bajo la tutela de Puerto Rico. Cada cual tiene el derecho a ser una entidad separada, por el otro lado PR y USVI deberían aumentar su cooperación económica y geo-política ya que ambos son territorios de USA con basicamente las mismas limitaciones territoriales o coloniales.
 

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Despertando este tema con dos cosas. La primera... Puerto Rico e Islas Vírgenes tienen varias diferencias bastante profundas por encima de nuestras semejanzas. La más fundamental es que Puerto Rico es un país latino y las Islas Vírgenes están relativamente americanizadas (y también viene de su herencia británica) hasta el punto que hablan inglés y nosotros español.

En otro tema... esto salió publicado estos días.


Publicado en Virgin Islands Daily News

Business owners: Tourists upset by water shortage
By Michael Todd (Daily News Staff)
Published: January 5, 2012

ST. THOMAS - The WAPA water crisis is taking a toll on tourism during the island's peak season.

One visitor in abject frustration trashed a downtown restaurant bathroom after having seen numerous "no bathroom" signs Wednesday.

Tavern on the Waterfront owner Slawek Labeda said that he understood the outburst - which destroyed a hinged door - on what could have been the man's only vacation this year.

Labeda, who has owned the restaurant for 10 years and says he has never faced such a crisis on St. Thomas, said he approaches every table with an apology but contends his service has not slipped.

"It's a nightmare," he said. "It's just one big disaster. Besides the business losing money, it gives the island a bad reputation."

Wednesday, because of inoperable bathrooms, inoperable fountain and dishwashing machines and a scarcity of ice, cruise ship passengers were being diverted away from downtown and toward the resorts, according to some downtown business and restaurant owners.

Today, the V.I. Water and Power Authority continues its water rationing to St. Thomas' 5,500 customers, who have been without regular service since Nov. 15. That was when Unit 11, a steam-generating boiler, sprang leaks and forced WAPA to cut regular water production.

Wednesday, WAPA pumped water to Main Street businesses and residents from 6 to 8 a.m., a schedule that forced many restaurant owners to arrive before dawn to fill buckets in preparation for what should have ranked among their year's busiest times. Instead, they served customers using paper plates and cups because there was no water to operate dishwashing machines.

At Amalie Cafe, employees have been boiling water to do the dishes, said restaurant owner Randolph Maynard.

With inadequate water to run his business, Maynard has to buy 400 pounds of ice each morning, and he has spent $1,100 during the last nine days.

"It's driving up the cost of doing business, and it's leaving a lasting impression on people," Maynard said. "Everybody who eats at my restaurant is from somewhere else."

Maynard said he does not blame WAPA but the entire lack of governmental response that has helped drive tourists away from shopping and eating downtown during the shortage.

"It's the lack of response from the government and from Tourism," he said.

While his restaurant has a backup cistern that has helped the business cope with doing dishes by hand, it hasn't pumped enough water for the toilets.

"I'm constantly filling up buckets to flush the toilets," Maynard said. "It just looks bad."

Cruise ship passengers have been detouring to resorts instead of downtown, said Kahuna Surf Shack manager Marc Gross.

"It's horrible," Gross said. "This should be one of the busiest weeks of the year, and we're not getting the business. The cruise ships are telling their customers not to come downtown because there are no bathrooms."

From those passengers who have frequented Kahuna Surf Shack, the news Gross has learned is grim.

"I've been hearing nonstop from cruise ship passengers that they're telling they're families they'll never come back to St. Thomas," Gross said.

Gross and other restaurant owners have had to buy canned drinks because there is insufficient water pressure to pump fountain drinks.

Thanks to its cistern, the Green House Bar and Restaurant has some of the few functional bathrooms in downtown, which has helped business.

"It's been slammed this week because of it," said server Cherie Brown. "People just stray in because we have a bathroom."

But the restaurant has had to begin stopping the surplus of nonpaying walk-ins.

At Tavern on the Waterfront, Labeda said restaurants are in a unique position to hear the complaints.

"When I'm dealing with up to 80 people a day, I do hear the comments," Labeda said. "I wish one of the senators would sit here at the bar and listen."

Maynard said that his 10-year-old business is financially better off now than it has ever been, but the financial crunch caused by the water crisis is unacceptable.

"We're at the peak of the season and this happens," he said. "This is what we get? How do we not have water?"

WAPA is pumping 750,000 gallons of water daily by a temporary reverse osmosis system that filters seawater.

The utility expects to increase that amount to 1.5 million gallons of water per day by this weekend, said WAPA spokeswoman Cassandra Dunn.

Some customers have told The Daily News that despite the rationing, they never receive any water.

Dunn said water service is an inexact science.

"We haven't been in this place before," Dunn said. "Even though there's a solution in place that we planned for 18 months ago, these events right here were unanticipated."

Health concerns

Last week, the V.I. Health department issued a press release that warned residents to ward off the threat of infectious disease spawned by the water shortage at home with advice that includes frequent hand washing.

"Hand hygiene is critical to interrupt the spread of infectious diseases such as the common cold, influenza and gastrointestinal illnesses," according to the press release. The release did not elaborate on where residents were supposed to get water to wash their hands.

Health Department officials did not return phone calls from The Daily News.

- Contact reporter Michael Todd at 714-9104 or email [email protected]

Read more: http://virginislandsdailynews.com/n...set-by-water-shortage-1.1253605#ixzz1iofyNEf8
 

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WAPA restores full water service

By Michael Todd (Daily News Staff)
Published: January 7, 2012


ST. THOMAS - Friday, for the first time in 52 days, the V.I. Water and Power Authority consistently pumped water on St. Thomas.
The restoration of regular service to all 5,500 St. Thomas customers is expected about noon today, said WAPA spokeswoman Cassandra Dunn.
Businesses and residents celebrated steady water pressure, which was available since early Friday morning.
After 16 days without water, the Miller Manor at the base of Solberg Hill had steady service since 6:45 a.m. Friday, said hotel owner Harry Wynns.
"It was excellent pressure today," Wynns said. "It's been so long, I've forgotten what it's like."
One night recently, Wynns recalled telling 31 guests to brush their teeth using bottled water. On Friday, he said he was glad to see the WAPA water crisis lifted.
Fireburn Hill resident Jan Lundquist said her home had running water since 6 a.m. Friday.
"And the flow was fairly strong," Lundquist said. "I was surprised, actually."
WAPA has rationed water since Nov. 15, when Unit 11, a steam-generating boiler, sprang leaks and left 5,500 customers on St. Thomas without regularly scheduled running water for almost two months.
WAPA initially provided water to customers for four hours in the morning and the evening, but as repairs progressed in the following weeks, that schedule was cut in half, to two hours in the morning and two hours in the evening.
Repairs to Unit 21, a waste-heat recovery boiler, were completed Thursday night and revived at least two of the Harley Plant's aging desalination units, which produced 1.5 million gallons Friday, said WAPA spokeswoman Cassandra Dunn.
In addition, six temporary reverse osmosis units on Friday pumped 1.5 million gallons, doubling production to 3 million gallons per day.
St. Thomas requires 1.8 million gallons per day.
Once the utility produced enough water to replenish storage and pump water to customers, it abandoned the daily schedules and began filling all St. Thomas water lines Friday morning, Dunn said.
Elevated areas and those at the end of water lines were likely to be the last to receive water Friday, Dunn said.
"If not, people would have called, and the Call Center tells me there hasn't been a lot of calls from people at higher elevations," she said.
With public schools reopening Monday, Dunn said there is a chance WAPA would ration water that day to ensure water pressure was sufficient to flow to the schools.
She said WAPA would make that decision Sunday.
Flushing the pipes
A number of WAPA customers submitted photos of discolored tap water to The Daily News this week.
Because the water crisis left the island's antiquated ductile iron pipes empty, the lining corroded and tainted the water by the time it reached taps, Dunn said.
"When we are at full throttle, the water is automatically flushing the lines," Dunn said.
As WAPA returned online, workers manually flushed the pipes by opening the lines' valves, which has accounted for minimal water loss, she said.
Dunn recommends that customers with murky tap water call WAPA and let the water flush through their toilets.
"That would help clear the lines coming into the homes or businesses," Dunn said. "It will clear shortly as we get more consistent flow. It's rust from the lining. It's not toxic.
"We know that it is not the quality of water that our customers would want to use for drinking, cooking or bathing," Dunn said.


Read more: http://virginislandsdailynews.com/news/wapa-restores-full-water-service-1.1254445#ixzz1ipl14TPt
 

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Well that's funny because I went on cruise last week and St. Thomas was supposed to be the first stop. However, they changed the schedule, making it the last so by Saturday there was water :p

Pero yeah, de acuerdo con lo que dijistes Luisr. Ciertamente alli el lenguaje es inglés y es mayoría decendencia negro. Pero cuando uno ve las calles hay una similidad ca~ona. Las areas pobres se veían igualitas a las de PR. Y otra diferencia, se guía por la izquierda.

Bueno aquí foto que le cogí del FB de mi hermana de Charlotte Amalie capital de USVI en St. Thomas:

 

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Vuelo inagural del Aeropuerto de San Juan,PR al Aeropuerto de St.Thomas, USVI

 

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Guiando a la izquierda en St. Thomas


Gracias a (vsci79) por postear su video en YouTube.
 

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Senators to consider sports complex

By JOY BLACKBURN (Daily News Staff)
Published: May 9, 2012

ST. CROIX - The Senate Human Services, Recreation and Sports Committee is scheduled tonight to again take up consideration of a bill authorizing development of a multi-million dollar sports complex in Frederiksted. The committee first heard testimony about the proposal on April 16, during a meeting that started at 6 p.m. and extended past midnight. After multiple rounds of questioning, senators voted to hold the bill - which would authorize the government to move forward with the project - in committee for further consideration.

The proposal has sparked controversy, with some community members at the April meeting strongly supporting the measure and some voicing their opposition. The project would feature stadiums for baseball, aquatics, tennis and beach volleyball. Committee Chairman Sen. Alvin Williams Jr. said he expects the committee will take a vote on the measure tonight. "I am going to be entertaining a motion tomorrow," Williams said Tuesday afternoon. "I don't want it to ever come across that I'm keeping a bill in committee trying to make it die in committee."

He would not speculate on whether the bill would move forward with a favorable recommendation. "I'm just looking forward to getting the discussion started and getting the bill out of the committee, whether it's up or down," Williams said, adding that senators may have amendments for the bill. Invited testifiers tonight include a number of government officials and principals from some of the companies involved in the proposal, including GlobeVest V.I. Members of the community also are listed among the testifiers on the Senate calendar for tonight's meeting.

Williams said he felt that the committee had exhausted the testimony from the public on the bill last month. The proposal, which Government House has characterized as a public-private partnership, would have the government putting up $30 million for the sporting complex, with private investors responsible for $25 million.

The bill would:

Ratify a memorandum of agreement among the V.I. government, GlobeVest-VI LLC, Network Sports Marketing LLC and National Swimming Center Corporation for developing and operating the stadium. GlobeVest-VI LLC is a joint venture between Denver-based GlobeVest LLC and General Engineering Corporation, a local company that also is called GEC. Authorize the governor and the commissioner of the V.I. Property and Procurement Department to execute contracts for designing, developing, constructing, financing and managing the complex. The contract process would include a master service agreement specifying what would be governed by the general terms in the memorandum of agreement. According to testimony at the April hearing, that master service agreement, once developed, would not need Senate approval. Authorize the V.I. Public Finance Authority to issue the bonds to finance $25 million for the government's portion of the project. The bonds would be secured by Community Facilities Trust revenues, part of the rum coverover revenues coming to the territory as a result of its agreement with rum producer Diageo. Approve all actions the government already has taken to procure, negotiate and contract for the design, construction, financing and management of the complex. Reprogram money for the pre-construction phase of the project. The government would be responsible for the $5 million pre-construction phase, which would include environmental and engineering studies, design documents and demolition of the Paul E. Joseph Stadium.

Read more: http://virginislandsdailynews.com/news/senators-to-consider-sports-complex-1.1312565#ixzz1uPuvyHpM

FUENTE: http://virginislandsdailynews.com/news/senators-to-consider-sports-complex-1.1312565#axzz1uPuLszBk
 
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