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So incredibly NOT urban development news........ :lock::lock::lock:
 

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I am John Doe
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I found this.

Title 18, Chapter 121, Section 2709 of the U.S. Code.

§ 2709. Counterintelligence access to telephone toll and transactional records
(a) Duty to provide.--A wire or electronic communication service provider shall comply with a request for subscriber information and toll billing records information, or electronic communication transactional records in its custody or possession made by the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation under subsection (b) of this section.

(b) Required certification.--The Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, or his designee in a position not lower than Deputy Assistant Director at Bureau headquarters or a Special Agent in Charge in a Bureau field office designated by the Director, may--

(1) request the name, address, length of service, and local and long distance toll billing records of a person or entity if the Director (or his designee) certifies in writing to the wire or electronic communication service provider to which the request is made that the name, address, length of service, and toll billing records sought are relevant to an authorized investigation to protect against international terrorism or clandestine intelligence activities, provided that such an investigation of a United States person is not conducted solely on the basis of activities protected by the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States; and

(2) request the name, address, and length of service of a person or entity if the Director (or his designee) certifies in writing to the wire or electronic communication service provider to which the request is made that the information sought is relevant to an authorized investigation to protect against international terrorism or clandestine intelligence activities, provided that such an investigation of a United States person is not conducted solely upon the basis of activities protected by the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States.

(c) Prohibition of certain disclosure.--No wire or electronic communication service provider, or officer, employee, or agent thereof, shall disclose to any person that the Federal Bureau of Investigation has sought or obtained access to information or records under this section.

(d) Dissemination by bureau.--The Federal Bureau of Investigation may disseminate information and records obtained under this section only as provided in guidelines approved by the Attorney General for foreign intelligence collection and foreign counterintelligence investigations conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and, with respect to dissemination to an agency of the United States, only if such information is clearly relevant to the authorized responsibilities of such agency.

(e) Requirement that certain congressional bodies be informed.--On a semiannual basis the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation shall fully inform the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives and the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate, and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives and the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate, concerning all requests made under subsection (b) of this section.

Poll: Most Americans Support NSA's Efforts

By Richard Morin
Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, May 12, 2006; 7:00 AM

A majority of Americans initially support a controversial National Security Agency program to collect information on telephone calls made in the United States in an effort to identify and investigate potential terrorist threats, according to a Washington Post-ABC News poll.

The new survey found that 63 percent of Americans said they found the NSA program to be an acceptable way to investigate terrorism, including 44 percent who strongly endorsed the effort. Another 35 percent said the program was unacceptable, which included 24 percent who strongly objected to it.

A slightly larger majority--66 percent--said they would not be bothered if NSA collected records of personal calls they had made, the poll found.

Underlying those views is the belief that the need to investigate terrorism outweighs privacy concerns. According to the poll, 65 percent of those interviewed said it was more important to investigate potential terrorist threats "even if it intrudes on privacy." Three in 10--31 percent--said it was more important for the federal government not to intrude on personal privacy, even if that limits its ability to investigate possible terrorist threats.

Half--51 percent--approved of the way President Bush was handling privacy matters.

The survey results reflect initial public reaction to the NSA program. Those views that could change or deepen as more details about the effort become known over the next few days.

USA Today disclosed in its Thursday editions the existence of the massive domestic intelligence-gathering program. The effort began soon after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Since then, the agency began collecting call records on tens of millions of personal and business telephone calls made in the United States. Agency personnel reportedly analyze those records to identify suspicious calling patterns but do not listen in on or record individual telephone conversations.

Word of the program sparked immediate criticism on Capitol Hill, where Democrats and Republicans criticized the effort as a threat to privacy and called for congressional inquiries to learn more about the operation. In the survey, big majorities of Republicans and political independents said they found the program to be acceptable while Democrats were split.

President Bush made an unscheduled appearance yesterday before White House reporters to defend his administration's efforts to investigate terrorism and criticize public disclosure of secret intelligence operations. But he did not directly acknowledge the existence of the NSA records-gathering program or answer reporters' questions about it.

By a 56 percent to 42 percent margin, Americans said it was appropriate for the news media to have disclosed the existence of this secret government program.

A total of 502 randomly selected adults were interviewed Thursday night for this survey. Margin of sampling error is five percentage points for the overall results. The practical difficulties of doing a survey in a single night represents another potential source of error.
It looks like a majority of Americans are sensible after all.

"A strict observance of the written laws is doubtless one of the high duties of a good citizen, but it is not the highest. The laws of necessity, of self-preservation, of saving our country when in danger, are of higher obligation. To lose our country by a scrupulous adherence to written law would be to lose the law itself, with life, liberty, property, and all those who are enjoying them with us; thus absurdly sacrificing the end to the means. When, in the battle of Germantown, General Washington's army was annoyed from Chew's house, he did not hesitate to plant his cannon against it, although the property of a citizen. When he besieged Yorktown, he leveled the suburbs, feeling that the laws of property must be postponed to the safety of the nation. While the army was before York, the Governor of Virginia took horses, carriages, provisions and even men by force, to enable that army to stay together till it could master the public enemy; and he was justified. [...]In all these cases, the unwritten laws of necessity, of self-preservation, and of the public safety, control the written laws of meum and tuum*."

------Thomas Jefferson to John Colvin, 1810

*=meum and teum, or meum et tuum is a Latin pharse referring to property rights.
 

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^^^^^^UMMM.....ok and just what are we preserving ourselves against....you fear mongering ningkumpoop???

I particuliarly like how you conveniently highlighted items close to your agenda .....servile fascist



but not this from your quote....
.....provided that such an investigation of a United States person is not conducted solely on the basis of activities protected by the first amendment to the Constitution of the United States......
 

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Here's some interesting facts on the NSA that I never knew. They may have been listening to us since the beginning of WWII.

ABOUT THE NSA
As a nod to the secrecy of the National Security Agency, people have jokingly said that its acronym — NSA — stands for "no such agency," or even "never say anything." The agency, headquartered at Fort Meade in Maryland, is the largest government spy outfit in the world.

Number of employees
30,000

Who they are
Mathematicians, linguists, engineers, physicists, computer scientists, engineers and other specialists and staff.

Budget
Classified

What it does
Cryptology, the science of making and cracking codes.
Making codes is referred to as "information assurance" in NSA language. This is the art of scrambling signals to prevent people from tapping into telephone signals and other communications.
For example, one of the NSA missions is to assure President Bush talks on a secure telephone line.
Cracking codes is referred to as "signals intelligence" at the NSA. This is the science of tapping into telephone conversations and other communications. It includes analysis of codes and the use of people who have a deep understanding not only of foreign languages but also cultures. This helps those people offer understanding of subtle layers, such as sarcasm, in foreign languages.
 

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I am John Doe
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forumly_chgoman said:
^^^^^^UMMM.....ok and just what are we preserving ourselves against....you fear mongering ningkumpoop???
The great big "T" word.

I particuliarly like how you conveniently highlighted items close to your agenda .....servile fascist
I'd like to start off by saying that most people wouldn't know a fascist if Benito Mussolini himself slapped them on the face.

In regards to what I bolded:
--First of all, bolding, underlining, and italicizing (sometimes used together) is a common way to place emphasis on certain important items in a larger document both here and on many websites throughout the net.
--Secondly, the parts I bolded were only parts I wished to place special emphasis on because I felt they were the most important parts. However, the document itself is still relevant to my argument.
 

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ironchapman said:
The great big "T" word.
So, wiretapping phone lines will prevent terrorism while our armed forces-the only people who can really stop terrorists-are fighting a damn useless war on the other side of the planet?
 

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VanSeaPor said:
So, wiretapping phone lines will prevent terrorism while our armed forces-the only people who can really stop terrorists-are fighting a damn useless war on the other side of the planet?
Depends on how "useless" or "useful" you perceive it (the war) is.

Actually, in this case, it is not wiretaps that are being used, but rather only records of what numbers we called.
 
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