SkyscraperCity Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Moderator
Joined
·
11,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A thread to present valuable historical object of Morocco and to discuss them.

I'll begin with a Veterinary treatise which dates back to the 18th century Ad. like the following article says, the most important thing in this treatise, is the 9 miniatures that it contains, and the level of realism of them, considering that iconographic representations were forbidden since the medieval era.

كتاب في العناية بالخيل و سائر دواب الركوب​

Name of Object: Veterinary treatise Kitâb fî al-inâya bi al-khayli wa sâiri-d-awâbbi al-rukub
Holding Museum: Royal Library, Rabat, Morocco
Dimensions: Height 22 cm, width 16.5 cm
Material(s) / Technique(s): Paper, brown and coloured inks.
Date of Object: Hegira 1126 / AD 1714
Period / Dynasty: 'Alawid; reign of Mulay Isma'il (r. AH 1082–1140 / AD 1672–1727)
Provenance: Morocco.

...The colophon at the end of the third volume provides the date of the manuscript without mentioning the copyist's name.

The significance of this manuscript lies in the nine miniatures, some of which are captioned, that illustrate the texts. Each depicts a horse, alone or with a carer, grazing, having its teeth checked, covering, being given medicine with a horn, swimming and having its mouth examined for an illness that prevents it from eating normally. Each miniature appears in a square space filling nearly the whole of the width of the page to the same height as the written area and sometimes framed with a triple red line. The people and the horses as well as their surroundings are depicted with great realism and detail.
Source: Discoverislamicart

 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
11,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Moroccan astrolabe​



Title/name : Moroccan astrolabe
Discovery place : Morocco
Date / period : 1765-1790
Materials and techniques : Brass, engraved inscriptions
Conservation place : Musée de l’Institut du Monde Arabe, Legs Marcel Destombes, Paris
Inscription : Signature of Charaf Allah

Thanks to its engraved lines, the astrolabe enables the user to establish and predict the course of the stars, to determine the time of day or night, the latitude of the location, to determine the height of something and to calculate a direction. Thought to have been invented during the era of Ptolemy (second century), great improvements were made to the instrument by the Arabs; first in Syria, under the Umayyads (particularly in Harran), then in Iraq, thanks to the scientific activity supported by Caliph al-Mamūn. Up to the nineteenth century, and even later in Morocco, Muslim countries produced astrolabes.

The tympan, a representation of the local celestial sphere, was made for a given latitude. It must be changed when the latitude changes. An astrolabe usually has several tympans. This astrolabe has two: one made especially for the cities of Essaouira (31°) and Marrakech (32°), the other for the cities of Fez (33°) and Meknès (34°). On the back of the instrument are the names of the client, Muhammad bin Abd Allah, and the maker, Charaf Allah.

It was via Muslim Spain, then Catalonia with its many Benedictine abbeys, and via the exchanges between monasteries and cathedral schools that the science of the astrolabe, which was so advanced in Muslim countries, spread in the Latin West beginning in the eleventh century.
Source: Qantara




Qantara
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
11,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Small gazelle in bronze​


Name of Object: Small gazelle in bronze
Holding Museum: Archeological Museum, Rabat, Morocco
Dimensions: Total height 13 cm, diameter 5 cm
Material(s) / Technique(s): Solid cast bronze.
Date of Object: Hegira late 4th and 8th centuries / AD late 10th and 14th centuries
Period / Dynasty: Umayyad; Marinid
Provenance: Dual provenance: the upper part was from Córdoba and the lower part was made in Morocco.

This bronze object is composed of three superimposed elements: a small gazelle joined to a rectangular pedestal on top of a ball with a shaft, above a small sphere surrounded by a four-petal corolla. Rivets fix all these elements to the shaft, which holds the different components and serves as an axis. The gazelle, the support, the ball and the shaft are solid cast. The animal has an arched neck and a thin layer of gold covers its body. The tops of its legs are decorated with geometrical knotwork and a woven design on their inner side whereas the inside of the neck is decorated with dots. The small rounded tail is stamped with a cruciform pattern. The gazelle's elegance and its decoration are reminiscent of Umayyad bronzes from Córdoba.

The hollow sphere is not decorated and it is formed by two welded elements. The corolla is made out of flat strips cut into four wide lanceolate petals, gilded with serrated edges. The outside of the strips are decorated with a floral pattern with smooth palms and Marinid-style foliage.
The two parts of this small bronze do not appear to belong to the same period. In all probability the upper part, gazelle and shaft, was made in Córdoba during the Caliphate period. The sphere and the four-petalled corolla would have been added in the Marinid period, possibly to use it at the top of an aquamanile.
Source: Discoverislamicart






Discoverislamicart
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top