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Haven't read the whole thread but have we noted the recent sad disappearnce, almost unmourned save by me, of one of London's real gems of modernism - rare modernist building in that it was classically handsome - Clments House on Gresham St (almost opposite the Guildhall)?
I agree with you on Clements hose- It was one of the better post war modernist numbers. Don't agree with you on Austral house though. Couldn't stand that one & glad to see the back of it.

As Potto mentioned thers quite a nice collection of new buildings around this area with Fosters, Rogers, Grimshaw & Parry and shows not all office blacks are bad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #323 ·
That Foster Lloyds TSB building is class, 2nd building from the top right. The area around that particular building is a joy to walk around architecturally speaking.
Not sure which you're refering to, but I think you mean 25 Gresham Street....which is a 2003 Nicholas Grimshaw designed building:



and this be diagonally across the road - the Foster designed 10 Gresham Street:



Two fine examples of modern groundscrapers which make no detrimental impact on the skyline, yet provide contemporary modern offices as presented by two leading British architects. What's not to like team? 25 Gresham Street has a lovely little sunken public garden in front of it - albeit, consecrated ground, due to its historical use as a plague pit. Hmmm, nice, remember that next time you tuck into your M&S pasta salad whilst sat there in the sunshine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #324 ·
No.1 Aldermansbury (to be home of the Belgian bank Fortis (providing they don't get taken over or merged in the next 6 months :) )) taken from Wood Street - and looking almost identical to its original render. Nice scheme, opens up a walkway route from Wood Street to Aldermansbury, and the stainless steel framing of the windows, whilst heavy, is quite unique.

 

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Not sure which you're refering to, but I think you mean 25 Gresham Street....which is a 2003 Nicholas Grimshaw designed building:
Ah yes the Grimshaw building is the one i was meant! But the Foster one, love the corner turret, have always appreciated that feature really adds to the area... just didnt realise it was Foster!
 

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the Foster designed 10 Gresham Street:

Ten Gresham's proportions are all wrong IMO and the corner towers look gawky. It also proved hard to let, but I tell you what, the materials are nothing short of lovely up close. All that brushed looking white stone and silky matt black steel.

This whole street was one of the first to be redeveloped in the fifties and as such had a lot of modernist blocks of varying qualities. Barrington House on the corner of Aldermanbury just west of the Guildhall was one of the first and most commercially successful of the fifties blocks. Clements House across the road was perhaps the best looking modernist building in the City. On the other hand the building that stood where 10 Gresham now stands was awful.
 

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The buildings replaced by the oval building and the new build bottom right, along with the white building above it were all occupied by the legal company Slaughter & May. I think they are the 2nd largest in the country.

Between 2000/01 I was a temp in the cost filing dept. Everytime some work was done on behalf of a client a note was made of how long it took and added to the client file. I once saw a minutes work billed at £9. No wonder the 100 or so partners could afford to pay themselves a £1m salary plus a bonus that was just as big. They moved into a purpose built building not far away.
 

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hi all again....
some wide angle shots. Was a big fan of the old 50's Austral house but like the way this sits with its neighbours..... and looks like a 60's seifert!





 

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Another building off London wall has gone in for planning- This replaces a horrid 60's block

Not much left of the post war mes that is London Wall except St Alphage house now.

I quite like this- It detracts away from the sheer blank wall that forms the back of Moorhouse .

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HKR Architects has submitted plans for this £74 million speculative office development in the City of London.

The 13-storey structure, which HKR won in competition last June, would face the Barbican.

Project architect Zeya Win said the challenging site complicated efforts to make the design as sustainable as possible. “The building has a triple-glazed facade to comply with Part L, and louvres to appease heat gains,” he said.

It steps down from 13 storeys to six to maintain light to the Barbican, which has enabled the inclusion of roof gardens.


This has now gone in for planning- Usual design statements, Views etc here

http://www.planning.cityoflondon.go...Corporation+of+London&appNumber=07/00092/FULL
 

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IMO it's an ok scheme & helps to break up the sheer flat bulk that is the back of Moor House.

Some pics






If & When this goes through it will just leave the Corp of London's Aldersgate House (the potential -although unlikely now JPM site) as the last plot not redeveloped along London Wall.
 

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One of those pics shows the walkway removed, while the other shows it still there.
I've never really like the walkways (although of course they are very useful!) but I wonder which of the images is correct?
 

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those walkways are protected so they have to include them in any development (although The Pinnacle got away with it, however it was specifically mentioned in the planning notice about its planned removal)

However I dont think this building ever had a walkway, It was quite a low rise structure previously and Im sure it didnt link up with the 'streets in the sky' concept of the rest of the place.
 

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IMO it's an ok scheme & helps to break up the sheer flat bulk that is the back of Moor House.

Some pics






If & When this goes through it will just leave the Corp of London's Aldersgate House (the potential -although unlikely now JPM site) as the last plot not redeveloped along London Wall.
I agree, this building really will do wonders for Moorhouse's ugly backside. It's nice when developers think about the surrounding area when designing a new building, though perhaps this is merely down to luck rather than any real thought on the developer's part?!
 

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hi all again....
some wide angle shots. Was a big fan of the old 50's Austral house but like the way this sits with its neighbours..... and looks like a 60's seifert!





There's shades of Seifert's NLA Tower here. Not 100% sure if I like it, but it fits in ok with the area's other buildings and I like the fact that it's not just another glass box.
 

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When you combine the other nearby projects, this whole area will be so overdeveloped in a few years. I fail to see anything appealing about any of this. Call me cynical, but it just seems like a load of huge blocks clustered together.

Tall enough to be dense and overbearing; short enough that they won't add anything to the skyline.

The very definition of groundscrapers in that sense.
 

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London Wall, 1962



London Wall was where the City of London built its postwar vision of a modern business quarter, but it turned out to be a disaster. In 2006, of its original five skyscraper blocks, only two survive.

In 1959, the 'South Barbican' plan, by the city of london and the LCC, was approved for the area which had previously hosted London's rag trade and been entirely blitzed in 1940. The plan was about circulation and offices. Pedestrians would circulate on a podium level 5.5m above street level, with bridges spanning London Wall, which was to be upgraded into a four lane highway. The traffic-free level of pubs, restaurants and plazas was to be a new environment alive with businesses and advertisements that would ultimately extend to cover the whole City. Le Corbusier had envisioned separating pedestrians from traffic. The City stipulated strict dimensions for the five parallel office towers, each let out to developers on tender, to create a dramatic urban perspective of clean, modern blocks grouped together, with three north of the highway and two to the south. The London Wall blocks were staggered at an angle to the highway, each was to be 67m high, have a flororplan of 42.7x17.9m, and even the window widths and possible spandrel colours were specified. The idea of identical parallel slabs date back to van der Rohe's plan for the German Reichbank in 1933, and London was also inspired by Stockholm's Hoterget redevelopment scheme, which had similarly proportioned office slabs in the city centre.

The podium level soon became a deserted, windswpet area where businesses in leaky concrete kiosks failed. The towers became a byword for blandness, amplified by the way they were grouped. In Manhatten, the mind-numbing visual effect of parallel International Style office slabs became known as the Sixth Avenue Syndrome. London Wall was London's own version of this, but on a meaner scale. The effect was more like a set of matchboxes.

What really killed the original vision completely was the demolition of Lee House to build Alban Gate, which closed off the view down the London Wall axis. 40 Basinghall Street was reclad with dark blue reflective windows and veritcal aluminium lines by GMW, who would become masters of bringing dead City blocks back to life. It became City Tower and now looks quite slick. Moor House was demolished in 2001 and is replaced. Royex House was demolished in 2004 for a 71m, eighteen storey tall tower by Eric Parry Architects.

This leaves only St Alphage House in its original form, looking particularly dilapidated. There are plans to replace it with a massive twenty one-storey building by KPF. The strata of London's post-war skyscraper history are all contained on London Wall, from early International Style to Norman Foster's new curvy blocks, and St Alphage House is the last survivor of the bottom layer in the strata. Now robbed of its original confidence, it has even begun to take on a period charm, but it will soon also be lost.

London High, by Herbert Wright, 2006
 
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