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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Project for Public Spaces gives Vieux Port honourble mention and cites it as an great example as it hasn't been ruined by building crappy condos.

How to Turn a Waterfront Around

http://www.pps.org/info/newsletter/february2007/turn_waterfront_around

Thirteen key steps for creating great waterfronts.

As more cities envision their waterfronts as lively public destinations that keep people coming back, PPS outlines the following principles to make that happen. They are not all hard and fast laws, but rules of thumb drawn from 32 years of experience working to improve urban waterfronts around the world. These ideas can serve as the framework for any waterfront project seeking to create vibrant public spaces, and, by extension, a vibrant city.

7. ENCOURAGE 24-HOUR ACTIVITY BY LIMITING RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

Housing does not encroach on the waterfront in Montreal, Canada. Great waterfronts are not dominated by residential development. Why? Because these are places that are full of people, day and night. They are the sites of festivals, markets, fireworks displays, concerts and other high-energy gatherings. A high concentration of residential development limits the diversity of waterfront use and creates constituencies invested in preventing 24-hour activity from flourishing.

Great Waterfronts of the World

http://www.pps.org/info/newsletter/february2007/great_waterfronts

From Sydney Harbor to Venice's canals to Coney Island, these are special places that show us how to get back to the water.

A truly great urban waterfront is hard to come by. The PPS staff has examined more than 200 urban waterfronts around the world--cities on the sea (Hong Kong, Vancouver, Miami, Athens), rivertowns (London, Paris, Buenos Aires, Detroit), and sturdy lakefront burgs (Milwaukee, Chicago, Cleveland, Zurich). It is exceedingly rare to find a waterfront that succeeds as a whole, although there are promising elements in almost all of them. So when we sat down to share our notes about which waterfronts deserve to be called the world's best, it only made sense to create two categories. The first, "Waterfront Cities," considers the entire waterfront--how well it connects by foot to the rest of the city and sustains a variety of public activities in multiple areas. The second category, "Waterfront Places," looks separately at individual destinations along the water. When you experience these extraordinary public spaces, you realize how much more would be possible with a coordinated strategy to make the whole waterfront a place for people.

Honorable Mention
Baltimore, Maryland
Chicago, Illinois
Montreal, Canada
Nice, France
Porto, Portugal
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
San Francisco, California (North Waterfront)
 

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I don't want to turn this thread into a negative debate, however I personally avoid the waterfront when I'm in Montreal. Unless there is an event, I find it void of activity. It feels disconnected from the city for me, even from Old Montreal. It's nice enough, but there is nothing much there... perhaps residents enjoy it more than visitors? Just a thought. Keep in mind I am weighing it against other areas of Montreal that are a much higher priority to see.

In the 19th photo there is a ship with a blue smokestack with what looks to be the old Ontario Northland logo on it... is that the old M.S Nindawayma that used to sail from Tobermory? I'm doubting anyone might even remember that... it was only in operation for one or two years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is this the ship you mean? I remember wondering what it was:

It was originally a ferry in Spain, then between England and the Isle of Mann, briefly in Norway and for 4 years it ran from Tobermory. It was used as the evil dude's lair in Bon Cop Bad Cop. Now it's in Sault Ste Marie and it looks as if it'll be scrapped.

Here's the Wiki article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nindawayma
 

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Yep, that is the one. I rode on it once... it only ran between 1989 and 1992. I can't believe how shitty it looks now!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yep, that is the one. I rode on it once... it only ran between 1989 and 1992. I can't believe how shitty it looks now!
That's a beautiful run from Tobermory on the Chi Cheemaun! I rode it about 10 years ago.
 

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That's a beautiful run from Tobermory on the Chi Cheemaun! I rode it about 10 years ago.
nice... most of my family is from the Manitoulin Island.

Hey Habfanman, there is some sort of terminal at Montreals waterfront; it has restricted access. What is it for?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
nice... most of my family is from the Manitoulin Island.

Hey Habfanman, there is some sort of terminal at Montreals waterfront; it has restricted access. What is it for?
That's probably the Iberville cruise ship terminal on Quai Alexandra.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
nice... most of my family is from the Manitoulin Island.

Hey Habfanman, there is some sort of terminal at Montreals waterfront; it has restricted access. What is it for?
Here are a few of the liners that run regular service out of the Iberville terminal. The cruise season runs from May to October with September/October being the busiest due to the fall colours in New England and along the St Lawrence. Holland America, Princess, Crystal and Olsen run regular service from NYC and Boston up to Maine, the Maritimes and Québec to Montréal. Crystal are ridiculously expensive 'themed' tours from NY such as Gourmet, Gallery/Museum, Classical/Opera, Theatre/Dance etc. Olsen was one that I looked into because it runs from Dover UK to the Faroes and Iceland (!!), up to Montréal and down to NY back to Dover. Wow! There's a monster run that begins in Dover, tours the East coast and ends up in Rome. Holland America goes from here to Boston, and sometimes NY, Fort Lauderdale and back. Princess goes to Nassau Bahamas. Almost all of them do a similar combination of stops from either NY or Boston: Bar Harbour Maine, Halifax, NFLD, the Sageunay Fjord, Québec and Montréal.


Olsen, Seabourne Pride


MV Astor


Crystal Symphony




Holland America, Maasdam


AML, Calvalier Maxim. This is the famous Party Boat that departs at midnight and returns around 4ish. There is also a Sunday brunch tour, dinner tours, dance tours and one for each of the 10 evenings of the International des Feux fireworks competition. AML also runs ferrys from Old Port to Parc Jean Drapeau and Longeuil and tours to Sageunay Fjord, Quebec and Tadoussac for whale watching.
 

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I heard Montreal old port is under the Federal administration , so any activity going on over there have be to approved and funded by Canada, is that true ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I heard Montreal old port is under the Federal administration , so any activity going on over there have be to approved and funded by Canada, is that true ?
Yes Skyboi, all major Canadian ports, the Seaway and airports are controlled by Transport Canada. The ports themselves are administered by autonomous Port Authourities in each city and the lands and facilities are leased out to private concerns. The Montréal Port Authourity stretches along the river From Quai de l'Horlage to Rue Liebert in HoMa. The Old Port is a seperate entity that runs 2.5 km's from the Tour de l'Horlage in the east to the silos at the entrance to the Lachine Canal and includes the strip of land south of de la Commune. The MPA also runs Quai Alexandra as it controls cruise ship operations. The Lachine Canal was turned into a National Historic site and the canal itself is operated by Parks Canada with the lands surrounding it administered by the City of Montréal.
 

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I don't want to turn this thread into a negative debate, however I personally avoid the waterfront when I'm in Montreal. Unless there is an event, I find it void of activity. It feels disconnected from the city for me, even from Old Montreal. It's nice enough, but there is nothing much there... perhaps residents enjoy it more than visitors? Just a thought. Keep in mind I am weighing it against other areas of Montreal that are a much higher priority to see.

In the 19th photo there is a ship with a blue smokestack with what looks to be the old Ontario Northland logo on it... is that the old M.S Nindawayma that used to sail from Tobermory? I'm doubting anyone might even remember that... it was only in operation for one or two years.
Well then , just because of this gentlement's feeling toward the old Port that made me pop a though of that question ,so I wonder if the Old port had completly belonged and dicided by the City of Montreal of what kind of activity to stage there ,would it be any more intimate and closer to old Montreal as well the City itself ? but anyway to my personal experience with the old port ,I just love it cause I live nearby and to take a walk along the promenade every time I can espescially in the summer time ,and contrary with instead of residents more than visistors to stroll along the old port I would disagree ,as a witness I often over heard people speaking maybe half english and at other languages equally with french there ,and that 's good thing because compare to other tourist destinations of the world the locals usually tend to avoid those tourist spots ,I don't know if they want to reserve the place for visistors or they don't love the place as much as we do here in Montreal
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well then , just because of this gentlement's feeling toward the old Port that made me pop a though of that question ,so I wonder if the Old port had completly belonged and dicided by the City of Montreal of what kind of activity to stage there ,would it be any more intimate and closer to old Montreal as well the City itself ? but anyway to my personal experience with the old port ,I just love it cause I live nearby and to take a walk along the promenade every time I can espescially in the summer time ,and contrary with instead of residents more than visistors to stroll along the old port I would disagree ,as a witness I often over heard people speaking maybe half english and at other languages equally with french there ,and that 's good thing because compare to other tourist destinations of the world the locals usually tend to avoid those tourist spots ,I don't know if they want to reserve the place for visistors or they don't love the place as much as we do here in Montreal
The same thing happened to me, I began thinking about all of the times I've been down there and why I went and what I did. My experience has been different from Algonquin's but then everyone goes to places at different times and with different expectations and ideas as to what they want to do.

I agree with you on the local/tourist split. I sometimes avoid Vieux Montréal because of the tourists but the Port crowd seems to be fairly evenly split. A funny thing happened last summer when I helped an elderly American couple with directions and they complimented me by saying "and you speak very good english"!! A proud moment indeed!

I love the fact that the entire Vieux Port is a public space and that the agenda hasn't been taken over by private concerns. When you have a Condofront, you wind up with homeowners calling the shots and a very limited amount of activities that can take place and vast areas are closed to the public because they are private property. Besides, who the hell goes to a city to look at condos?!?! You can do that anywhere and leave with that 'I just wasted part of my life looking at stupid condos' feeling. I'll take 18th and 19th century buildings over condos any day.

I've been down there as much in the winter as in the summer. In the summer I've gone to the Reggae Festival, Terrasses Bonsecours and and the International Flora but I mostly just go to chill out and go for a bike ride or stroll, Bassin Bonsecours is great for that. The best though was the Bjork concert on Quai Jacques-Cartier! WOW!! What an atmosphere, and you can't hold an event like that with bitchy condo owners complaining about noise. The winter though is what really sets Vieux Port apart from other waterfronts. Fantastic fireworks at Les Feux sur Glace, Festival en Lumière, New Years Eve and then Nuit Blanche, the skating rink (and rinkside bar hihi!), Bistro Bonsecours and best of all... IGLOOFEST!! Where else will 10,000 people dance for 4 days to the best DJ's in the world in -20 degree weather?

I love it down there and I still haven't done a quarter of what I want to. I want to go on the jet boat on the rapids and do some kayaking and canoeing. I haven't been to the Science Centre and have yet to check out the surfers. I want to take the ferry to Parc Jean Drapeau and go to Cirque du Soleil... and I want to go on the Party Boat!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Panographs of Vieux Port

Great panos of Vieux Port by Jean-Pierre Lavoie.

http://viewat.org/?i=en&id_aut=1033&id_pn=1460&pag=3&sec=pn
The skating rink at Bassin Bonsecours

http://viewat.org/?i=en&id_aut=1033&id_pn=1461&pag=3&sec=pn
Illumination of rue de la Commune

http://viewat.org/?i=en&id_aut=1033&id_pn=1464&pag=3&sec=pn
Interior of Notre-Dame-de-Bonsecours Chapel

http://www.photojpl.com/flash/08portuaires.html
Les Symphonies Portuaires de Pointe-à-Callière

There are more at Festival Montréal en Lumière/Highlights website (with sound!)
http://www.montrealenlumiere.com/galeries/2008/images_fr.aspx
 

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Those panos are awesome. Thanks for posting them. Do you know if he uses a special camera to take those pictures, or they stitched it with a lot of photos?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Those panos are awesome. Thanks for posting them. Do you know if he uses a special camera to take those pictures, or they stitched it with a lot of photos?
You don't need a special camera Ashok but a fisheye lens is recommended for a spherical pano (the ones that you can pan up and down as well as sideways). For a cylindrical (simply left/right pan), any lens will do. You have to overlap each frame by 20% and use manual settings in order to match the exposure. You then need stitching software in order to produce the end result. I wish I had the equipment to try it. Maybe I'll produce the world's first 1.3 megapixel cameraphone pano!
 
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