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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Kabah, Yucatan, Mexico


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kabah...:Map_of_the_Kabah_Maya_archeological_zone.jpg

The name "Kabah" or "Kabaah" is usually taken to be archaic Maya language for "strong hand". This is a pre-Columbian name for the site, mentioned in Maya chronicles. An alternative name is Kabahaucan or "royal snake in the hand".

The area was inhabited by the mid 3rd century BCE. Most of the architecture now visible was built between the 7th century and 11th centuries CE. A sculpted date on a doorjamb of one of the buildings gives the date 879, probably around the city's height. Another inscribed date is one of the latest carved in the Maya Classic style, in 987. Kabaah was abandoned or at least no new ceremonial architecture built for several centuries before the Spanish conquest of Yucatán.

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por Tatiana Proskouriakoff http://arqueologiamexicana.mx/mexico-antiguo/kabah-yucatan


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http://academic.reed.edu/uxmal/galleries/thumbnails/kabah/Kabah-CodzPoopF.htm http://academic.reed.edu/uxmal/galleries/thumbnails/kabah/Kabah- CodzPoopF-1.htm


http://academic.reed.edu/uxmal/galleries/thumbnails/kabah/kabah-temple.htm


http://academic.reed.edu/uxmal/galleries/thumbnails/kabah/kabah-temple.htm


http://www.reed.edu/uxmal/galleries/thumbnails/kabah/kabah-arch.htm


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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The Palace of Santa Rosa Xtampak, Campeche, Mexico


The name Xtampak comes from a Maya meaning "old / ancient walls". It is a very old site. The cities origins date back to 400 BC. The top of the hill has been aligned and surrounded by falling terraces intended for cultivation. The city grew by 850 years, reaching its peak of development between 550-950. It was planned and beautifully decorated, and contributed to this undoubtedly specific location of the city: it lay in a place where interacted Chenes architectural styles and Puuc. Thanks in Santa Rosa Xtampak find magnificent monuments showing the typical features of each of these styles. Xtampak was the historical capital of the Chene Maya people.[1] The city is built on a natural elevation with a flattened and divided summit, it covers an approximate area of 9 square kilometers. Xtampak had over ten interlocked ceremonial plazas. During its golden age, the city was inhabited by 10,000 people. The buildings have a marked Chenes style, although there are some structures with a Puuc influence.

https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7010/6798398243_a0657b5054_b.jpg


https://austria-forum.org/af/Wissenssammlungen/Essays/Geographie/Santa_Rosa_Xtampak_Mexiko


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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Tulum, Quintana Roo, Mexico

This Maya site may formerly have been known by the name Zama, meaning City of Dawn, because it faces the sunrise. Tulum stands on a bluff facing east toward the Caribbean Sea. Tulúm is also the Yucatan Mayan word for fence, wall[1] or trench. The walls surrounding the site allowed the Tulum fort to be defended against invasions. Tulum had access to both land and sea trade routes, making it an important trade hub, especially for obsidian. From numerous depictions in murals and other works around the site, Tulum appears to have been an important site for the worship of the Diving or Descending god.[1]

Tulum was first mentioned by Juan Díaz, a member of Juan de Grijalva's Spanish expedition of 1518, the first Europeans to spot Tulum.[1] The first detailed description of the ruins was published by John Lloyd Stephens and Frederick Catherwood in 1843 in the book Incidents of Travel in Yucatan. As they arrived from the sea, Stephens and Catherwood first saw a tall building that impressed them greatly, most likely the great Castillo of the site. They made accurate maps of the site’s walls, and Catherwood made sketches of the Castillo and several other buildings. Stephens and Catherwood also reported an early classic stele at the site, with an inscribed date of AD 564 (now in the British Museum's collection). This has been interpreted as meaning that the stele was likely built elsewhere and brought to Tulum to be reused.[2]

Work conducted at Tulum continued with that of Sylvanus Morley and George P. Howe, beginning in 1913. They worked to restore and open the public beaches. The work was continued by the Carnegie Institution from 1916 to 1922, Samuel Lothrop in 1924 who also mapped the site, Miguel Ángel Fernández in the late 1930s and early 1940s, William Sanders in 1956, and then later in the 1970s by Arthur G. Miller. Through these later investigations done by Sanders and Miller, it has been determined that Tulum was occupied during the late Postclassic period around AD 1200. The site continued to be occupied until contact with the Spanish was made in the early 16th century. By the end of the 16th century, the site was abandoned completely.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8293/7648460474_de7ac7d83d_b.jpg


https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8293/7648460474_de7ac7d83d_b.jpg


https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8293/7648460474_de7ac7d83d_b.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Uaxactun, Guatemala

With recent[when?] achievements in the decipherment of the ancient Maya hieroglyphic writing system, it has been determined that the ancient name for this site translates roughly as Siaan K'aan or "Born in Heaven". The name Uaxactun was given to the site by its rediscoverer, United States archeologist Sylvanus Morley, in May 1916. He coined the name from Maya words Waxac and Tun, to mean "Eight Stones". The name has two meanings; Morley's stated reason for the name was to commemorate it as the first site where an inscription dating from the 8th Baktún of the Maya calendar was discovered (making it then the earliest known Maya date). The other meaning is a pun, since "Uaxactun" sounds like "Washington", the U.S. capital and home of the Carnegie Institute which funded Morley's explorations.[citation needed]

Linda Schele, in A Forest of Kings, devotes an entire chapter to a war between Tikal and Uaxactun, in which Uaxactun was defeated by forces led by Fire is Born[3] (Siyaj K'ak', formerly identified as Smoking Frog[4]) of Tikal. In this chapter, she also gives a brief overview of the known history of Uaxactun up to the final year of the war (378 AD) and of the Uaxactun kings who claimed descent from Fire is Born. The combined political entity of Tikal-Uaxactun dominated the Guatemalan Petén for the following 180 years.

Siyaj K'ak' might have come from Teotihuacán, been the general of the Teotihuacano ruler Spearthrower Owl, and conquered Tikal earlier the same year. This was a watershed moment of the Classic Maya. Some scholars suggested that new kings were installed at Tikal, Uaxactun, Rio Azul, El Peru, El Zapote and Bejucal during the Teotihuacan intrusions, new rituals and images were introduced, and a new order was established in the Maya Lowlands, while others suggested a less hegemonic role of Teotihuacan in its relationship with the Maya.[5]

by Tatiana Proskouriakoff


by Tatiana Proskouriakoff
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Labna, Yucatan, Mexico

Labna (or Labná in Spanish orthography) is a Mesoamerican archaeological site and ceremonial center of the pre-Columbian Maya civilization, located in the Puuc Hills region of the Yucatán Peninsula. It is situated to the south of the large Maya site of Uxmal, in the southwest of the present-day state of Yucatán, Mexico. It was incorporated with Uxmal as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996.

The site is a comparatively small and compact one. Among its notable structures is a large two-storey 'palace' ("El Palacio"), which is one of the longest contiguous structures in the Puuc region at approximately 120 m (393.7 ft) in length. From the palace, a ceremonial road (sacbe) extends to an elaborately decorated gateway arch ("El Arco"). This structure is 3 m (9.8 ft) wide and 6 m high, with well-reserved bas-reliefs. The arch is not an entrance to the city, but rather is a passageway between public areas.[1] Next to this gateway stands "El Mirador", a pyramid-like structure surmounted by a temple. Also on the site is the Temple of the Columns.

The structural design and motifs of the site's buildings are in the Maya architecture regional style known as Puuc. This makes extensive use of well-cut stone forming patterns and depictions, including masks of the long-nosed rain-god Chaac.

por Tatiana Proskouriakoff http://www.reed.edu/uxmal/galleries/thumbnails/labna/Labna-Palace-9.htm


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por Tatiana Proskouriakoff http://www.reed.edu/uxmal/galleries/thumbnails/labna/Labna-Arch-1.htm


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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Mitla(Lyobaa), Oaxaca, Mexico

All reconstruction illustrations made by Ludovic Celle https://www.behance.net/LudovicCelle

Mitla is the second most important archeological site in the state of Oaxaca in Mexico, and the most important of the Zapotec culture.[1][citation needed] The site is located 44 km from the city of Oaxaca.[2] in the upper end of the Tlacolula Valley, one of the three that form the Central Valleys Region of the state.[3] The archeological site is within the modern municipality of San Pablo Villa de Mitla.[4] While Monte Albán was most important as the political center, Mitla was the main religious center.[3] The name Mitla is derived from the Nahuatl name Mictlán, which was the place of the dead or underworld. Its Zapotec name is Lyobaa, which means “place of rest.” The name Mictlán was Hispanicized to Mitla by the Spanish.[5] However, what makes Mitla unique among Mesoamerican sites is the elaborate and intricate mosaic fretwork and geometric designs that cover tombs, panels, friezes and even entire walls. These mosaics are made with small, finely cut and polished stone pieces which have been fitted together without the use of mortar. No other site in Mexico has this

By Ludovic Celle https://www.behance.net/LudovicCelle


My image


My image


By Ludovic Celle https://www.behance.net/LudovicCelle


By Ludovic Celle https://www.behance.net/LudovicCelle


My image.


By Ludovic Celle https://www.behance.net/LudovicCelle
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
El Mirador, Guatemala


El Mirador flourished from about the 6th century BCE, reaching its height from the 3rd century BCE to the 1st century CE. Then it experienced a hiatus of construction and perhaps abandonment for generations,[5] followed by re-occupation and further construction in the Late Classic era, and a final abandonment about the end of the 9th century. The civic center of the site covers some 10 square miles (26 km2) with several thousand structures, including monumental architecture from 10 to 72 meters high.
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https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7029/6823667125_8a0164345a_b.jpg


http://amazingtemples.com/en/books/the-ancient-maya-sharer-traxler/attachment/at_img_0144/
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
La Blanca, Guatemala

La Blanca is a Maya archaeological site in the municipality of Melchor de Mencos in the northern Petén Department of Guatemala.[1] The site is located in the lower reaches of the Mopan River valley and features a large acropolis complex.[2] Activity at the site has been dated as far back as the Early Classic (AD 250–600), with principal occupation of the site occurring in the Late Classic period (AD 600–900),[3] although some level of occupation continued into the Early Postclassic (AD 900–1200).[4]

Dibujo: E. Meijide / © Proyecto La Blanca, 2012


Dibujo: E. Meijide / © Proyecto La Blanca, 2012
 
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