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In Time
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Hey guys, welcome to another of my NYC walking tours. I will take you now to Little Italy and Chinatown. As most of you know, there are hardly any Italians left living in Little Italy. But the area still preserves some of the Italian retail and restaurant vibe. Attracting tourists and locals to the area. Especially along Mulberry Street. Yet Chinatown has kept on growing. Eventhough there are two other Chinatowns in the city. One in Queens and th other in Brooklyn. Well since Manhattan is becoming so expensive only time will tell what will happend to this working class Chinatown. Photos were taken about 3 weeks ago. Hope you enjoy my pics. :)


Little Italy, Manhattan

Little Italy is a neighborhood in lower Manhattan, New York City, once known for its large population of Italians.

Historically, Little Italy extended as far south as Bayard St, as far north as Bleecker, as far west as Lafayette, and as far east as the Bowery. As Italian-Americans left Manhattan for other boroughs and neighborhoods, the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island, the neighborhood recognizable as Little Italy gradually shrank.

Large portions of the neighborhood were absorbed by Chinatown, as immigrants from China and other East Asian countries moved to the area. The northern reaches of Little Italy, near Houston Street, ceased to be recognizably Italian, and eventually became the neighborhood known today as NoLIta, an abbreviation for North of Little Italy. Today, the section of Mulberry Street between Broome and Canal Streets, lined with Italian restaurants popular with tourists, remains distinctly recognizable as Little Italy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Italy,_New_York_City


Chinatown, Manhattan

The Chinatown neighborhood of Manhattan — a borough of New York City — is an ethnic enclave with a large population of Chinese immigrants, similar to other Chinatown districts in American cities.

By the 1980s, it had surpassed San Francisco's Chinatown to become the largest enclave of Chinese immigrants in the Western Hemisphere.

Unlike most other urban Chinatowns, Manhattan's Chinatown is both a residential area as well as commercial area. Most population estimates are in the range of 150,000 to 250,000 residents (some estimates go as high as 350,000 residents). It is difficult to get an exact count, as neighborhood participation in the U.S. Census is thought to be low due to language barriers, as well as large-scale illegal immigration. Besides the more than 200 Chinese restaurants in the area for employment, there are still some factories. The proximity of the fashion industry has kept some garment work in the local area though most of the garment industry has moved to China.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinatown,_New_York,_New_York


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In Time
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
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