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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am currently working on a thread showing the little alleyways of New Castle, Delaware. After walking the streets of this colonial city, and then looking at a thread with pictures of some of Pittsburgh's hilly neighborhoods with quirky streets, I got curious as to if cities across the country have streets that are walkable only. They are usually tucked away in secret places, and act as shortcuts or at least routes to places that would be too burdensome for cars.

Walkable-only streets meet these two requirements:
~A named street recognized by the city, state and/or other government entities, to be used by the public.
~Not to be used by motorized vehicles, like cars, buses, motorcycles, trolleys, or light rail.


Are there any walking-only streets in your area? Do you have any pictures of these streets?


Here are my pictures of walkable-only streets:

Annapolis, Maryland, has a few walking-only streets. These streets came about because Annapolis is the only city in the United States that was laid out with just a radial street pattern. This set of radial streets was irregular, and so travelling from one place to another place that were on the same block or within a stone's throw sometimes took a long time because the block was so big. As a result, citizens started cutting across yards and properties for short-cuts. Annapolis eventually bought many of these short-cuts and made them into public streets. One such street is Chancery Court. Chancery Court is named after the Chancery Court of Maryland, which was an old court system that handled business matters only. Chancery Court connects State Circle to Main Street.

Chancery Court (to the right)




New Castle, Delaware, has several walkable-only streets. Some streets, like Church Alley and Read's Alley, provided short-cuts from Front Street (now called The Strand) to the market square at Market Street and Delaware Street. Silsbee's Alley provided a short-cut from the other direction: Fourth Street to Third Street and the town green. Other streets were pathways connecting Front Street to the wharves along the Delaware River. While the most prominent pathway to the wharves, Packet Alley, does allow for cars, Alexander Alley is one of these pathways that still exists and does not allow cars. In fact, Alexander Alley is paved with grass, and looks like no more than a side lawn.

Church Alley





Alexander Alley





Read's Alley







Silsbee's Alley






Old City and Society Hill in Philadelphia have many streets that are so narrow from the crowding of colonial Philadelphia that there's just not any room for cars. Bladen Court is one such street that is a small side street on a small side street in the middle of a city block.

Bladen Court



Elfreth's Alley is technically open to traffic, so unfortunately it cannot be included despite the discourageement of cars and encouragement of walkington tourists.
 

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We have some walking-only streets, not alleys, but real streets, full of houses.

here's one:
Rua da Junqueira (0.32 km) + 0.09 km 8seperated by a small crossing street


we have many others

Rua Latino Coelho (0.72km) - crosses some streets, parking area
Rua da Quingosta (14th century street, too small for anything except people)
Rua 31 de Janeiro (cars can park) 0.47 km
Rua dos Cafés 0.08km (continuous with Rua da Junqueira)
Rua da Alegria 0.10 km (continuous with Rua da Junqueira)
Rua da Ponte 0.10 km (continuous with Rua da Junqueira)
few others
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Hmm don't know pedestrian shopping areas count...but if the worlds largest is just around the corner from where I live:

Strøget
Is it a real street with addresses and everything? If so, then it definitely counts. As long as it is recognized as a street (as opposed to a park or something like that) by the city or other governments, then it counts.
 

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yes, but some here, are not shopping streets, but traditional neighbourhood streets (homes)
Nevertheless a big difference from Europe to the US, cause the streets that he should we wouldn't even consider them real streets.
It's not really a big difference between Europe and the USA - I don't think anyone in the US would really concider any of those places in the first pictures "streets". They're pretty, and it looks like a nice city, but those are just cut-throughs and access paths to the water/yards, etc.

There aren't many STREETS in the US that are ped only - not when comparing to Europe where they're in almost every city.

Here's one in my hometown, Iowa City (Iowa). It's a college town of around 85,000 people. The streets are Dubuque Street and College Street. There's a small plaza on the intersection of the two streets. There's a total of 4 blocks of the streets that are pedestrian only. These pictures are mostly of the center intersection of the streets, but there's a lot of shops and bars/restaurants on the other legs of the "ped mall"













I took most of those pictures (everything but the night shot) very early on a Sunday morning - after the University had released for the summer. It's normally MUCH more crowded than in these pictures....
 

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European cities seem as though they have built themselves on a walking culture, and as a result have a bunch of pedestrianized areas.
 

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^ definitely.

Many of their old towns are hundreds of years old, when most people could ONLY move by foot or at times horse, etc.

A majority of American cities came into their own in the latter half of the 19th and the early half of the 20th century. (I'm not talking Philly, Boston or NYC)
 

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Is it a real street with addresses and everything? If so, then it definitely counts. As long as it is recognized as a street (as opposed to a park or something like that) by the city or other governments, then it counts.
Yes it's a real street with adresses and everything (actually more street names; Frederiksberggade, Nytorv, Gammeltorv, Nygade, Vimmerskaftet, Amagertorv and Østergade)...:)

how many KM has the "largest" walking street in Europe?
It's ~1,1 km...also the first (shopping) pedestrian street in the world:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It's not really a big difference between Europe and the USA - I don't think anyone in the US would really concider any of those places in the first pictures "streets". They're pretty, and it looks like a nice city, but those are just cut-throughs and access paths to the water/yards, etc.
While my pictures of the streets are of cut-throughs and alleyways, they are all still official streets maintained by the cities and for public use. It is just that the purposes are different; they are not a location in and of themselves, and are just shortcuts that evolved over the centuries. Still they are interesting to see, and it's nice to see something different than cars driving paved streets once in a while. When was the last time that you saw a street paved with grass?
 

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Here are a few from Melbourne. There are alot of laneways and alleys in Melbourne that are primarily used by foot traffic. Some also are used by the occasional delivery vehicle and so don't fit into your criteria. These that follow are all pedestarian only (I think):






For more on streets like these check this thread out, http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=210850
 

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HK has alot of walking-only streets.

Here are some of them

Sai Yeung Choi St. South (Mongkok)


Jardine's Crecent (Causeway Bay)


Lan Kwai Fong (Central)
 

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In addition to the tourist traps, here are some pedestrianized wet markets that the locals in Hong Kong go to :

Mongkok Wet Market Photos
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=272163&highlight=mongkok

Fa Yuen Street - more geared for locals than tourists


Lan Kwai Fong is not a walking-only street. Cars can still go along that hilly stretch of road.

Other Asian cities also have examples of pedestrianized street markets, such as Seoul's Namdaemun :





Nanjing Road, Shanghai





Guilin, China


 

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In addition to the tourist traps, here are some pedestrianized wet markets that the locals in Hong Kong go to :


Nanjing Road, Shanghai

Some of these roads are partly "walking-only". The L-shaped part of Lan Kwai Fong is an example.

Also, in Nanjing Road, trolleys can pass through



............

In Manila, The Avenida is walking only ;)



Also Third St. in Santa Monica

 

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Some of these roads are partly "walking-only". The L-shaped part of Lan Kwai Fong is an example.

Also, in Nanjing Road, trolleys can pass through
Even some of the streets you mentioned about Hong Kong are not purely walking-only since delivery trucks can pass through (ie. Ladies market). Those trolleys are for tourism purposes and just run up and down the street, and is not part of regular vehicular traffic. I don't think they can even run on the regular streets.
 

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In Vienna there are several pedestrian streets, the most famous one listed below:

Kohlmarkt. From the imperial palace to the beginning of the Graben



Am Graben. (center of the 1st district)
Whereas its hard to say if its a street or already long square...



Kärntnerstraße (from the end of the Graben to the border of the 1st district)





Those three streets together are often called the "golden U". As they fomr an U together.

A quite large pedestrian street outside the 1st district is a long part of the Favoritenstraße. its in contrast to the streets above, no upper class shops or tourist location. Hard to find pictures of it on the net though






PS:
Those night photos above are very lively at day time, at night its calmer as all shops are closed. But you still will find a certain number just strolling around.
 
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