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A new bus line would give Rhode Island Avenue the transit it was meant to have


The G9, a new bus line that would run along Rhode Island Avenue from Mount Rainier into downtown, could become a reality if the DC Council decides to fund it this week. The G9 would give residents in the corridor a much-needed way to get downtown by transit, which their neighborhoods were built around in the first place.


http://greatergreaterwashington.org/post/30743/a-new-bus-line-would-give-rhode-island-avenue-the-transit-it-was-meant-to-have/
 

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DC looks more beautiful under the reflect by its
advantage bus system.
 

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Let’s take back DC’s buses and make them free




It's time for the District of Columbia to take over planning and operations for our intra-city buses from WMATA. Let's also add more funding to make them free for all riders.

DC relies on public transportation. Nearly 40 percent of the city's commuters take public transit of some form, and buses are a vital component of that system, with over 40 percent of those riders opting for buses. Recently, WMATA leadership has proposed cutting Metrorail service while increasing fares.

This will only serve to quicken the decline of vital public transportation, as it will surely result in reduced revenues, necessitating further cuts to service and reliability. With higher rail fares for less rail service, residents are going to turn to the bus even more.
http://ggwash.org/view/61631/lets-take-back-dcs-buses-and-make-them-free
 

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An aside: I travel a lot overseas. One of the best elements to some of the biggest cities I go to are the use of smaller busses on less popular routs or for late night service.

I don't understand why DC needs massive metro sized busses for every route when many only seem to carry one or two passengers. They are overly loud, more expensive, wastefull, less efficient, and damage roads more over time.
 

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The Smithsonian National zoo is currently in the process of designing a parking garage to help with parking issues and to reclaim some of the current lots for future animal exhibits/exhibit expansion. The reason why i'm posting this here is because of this paragraph:

In anticipation of the current project and based on the above guidance, Smithsonian Facilities commissioned a traffic study in consultation with the District Department of Transportation in 2016-2017 to assess the impact on numerous intersections and roadways in the vicinity of the Zoo. These studies revealed that there was little difference between the impact of the approved amount of visitor parking versus the amount we are now proposing. This study and DDOT’s response to it are included in the Appendix. During this study, DDOT proposed extending its Circulator bus service to the Zoo’s Connecticut Avenue entrance, an option that would require a convenient turnaround within the Zoo. That option is being further explored in a current Bus Circulation Study that will address all bus traffic within the zoo as part of the overall preparation for changes to land use, parking and vehicle circulation that will come with the implementation of the Central Parking Garage project as well as new security screening at Zoo entrances.
I believe this is the right thread, please let me know if there's a more appropriate thread.
 

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Here are the major changes that could come to Metro bus routes

Metro is considering a major slate of service changes on some of the region’s most heavily-traveled bus routes, and is convening a public hearing tonight to take feedback. Is your route among those that would be affected?

The changes being proposed are part of WMATA’s semi-regular bus State of Good Operations (SOGO) process, which periodically takes a look at service offerings with a goal of allocating resources more efficiently. This is typically a revenue-neutral exercise, whereby savings from cuts to underperforming or redundant service are matched by improvements to “productive” routes – although there are some improvements identified in this round that aren’t necessarily offset.

Many of the service alterations in this proposal originate from recommendations made in Metrobus line studies conducted over the past several years. Others were requested by one of the local jurisdictions or – as in the case of possible re-routings to The Wharf and Buzzard Point – represent an attempt to match transit service to new development. Changes would be implemented in either December of this year or June of next year.

So what does the package have in store?
 

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DC Circulator could see big changes under proposed plan

DDOT has proposed the first phase of major service changes to DC Circulator under a long-term Transit Development Plan that include overhauls of two routes and some additional service.
WASHINGTON — Significant changes to DC Circulator routes could come in the new year.

The District Department of Transportation has proposed the first phase of major service changes under a long-term Transit Development Plan that include overhauls of two routes and some additional service.
 

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D.C. Circulator will be privatized under a proposed $141M deal

The District has awarded a five-year, nearly $141 million contract to a multinational operator of transit systems to run the D.C. Circulator.

RAPT Dev North America, which already runs the D.C. Streetcar system, will maintain and operate the Circulator's six-line system and its 72-bus fleet. The contract, for $140.7 million over a base period of five years and three months, requires D.C. Council approval. It was submitted to the council on May 30.

This will be the first time the D.C. Department of Transportation has had direct oversight of the D.C. Circulator since it launched in 2005. The system is currently operated and maintained under agreement with the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority.
 

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Here’s where bus lanes may one day speed up your ride on 16th Street


During rush hours, buses on 16th Street will be able to bypass traffic in a bus lane, hopefully by 2020. On some of the street, anyway.

Planners from the District Department of Transportation (DDOT) unveiled their design for bus lanes on 16th Street, the next step from a 2016 planning study which recommended a dedicated bus lane in the peak direction during the peak period, as well as a number of other changes to make the 16th Street buses faster and more reliable.
 

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‘Prosperity in Peril’: DC region bus study recommends significant changes
The D.C. region could be suffocated by even more traffic if major improvements to the region’s bus system do not come soon, a draft report obtained by WTOP finds.

Even so, making those changes in a way that avoids negative impacts could be extremely challenging.

The Washington Area Bus Transformation Project draft strategy’s executive summary, labeled “not for circulation,” paints a dire picture of what happens if bus-only lanes, totally revamped bus routes and other changes are not implemented: “Without transforming the bus system, the region’s competitiveness and livability are at risk.”

The report groups more than two dozen recommendations into six broad areas. Some are clearly meant to directly make taking the bus quicker and easier; others focus on cost savings and shifting responsibility for routes between local bus systems and Metro.
 
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