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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
In 2006, the average annual premium for single coverage was $4,242, and workers were typically asked to pay $679 (or 16 percent) of this amount and their employer paid $3,563. For family coverage, workers were asked to pay $3,100 of the average annual premium of $11,480 (or 27 percent) and their employer paid $8,380.

http://images.google.com/imgres?img...es?q=ebri+health+premium+&svnum=10&um=1&hl=en



So on average, for individual coverage you get $700 deducted from your annual salary, while for family coverage you get $3,000 deducted from annual salary.

Honestly I thought it was much more. Still a big problem!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Has the amount Americans spend directly on health been growing?

It has grown from 4.8 percent of total personal expenditures in 1984 to 5.8 percent in 1993. Following 1993, health spending as a percentage of total expenditures declined reaching 5.2 percent by 1996. Since 1996, it has increased again, reaching 5.9 percent in 2004. In 2005, health spending declined by 0.2 percent.
 

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Many company plans cover less than they used to. My company's plan has been jettisoning benefits as costs have risen.

The bigger problem is that a gigantic percentage of this country isn't covered at all -- tens of millions of people. This is pathetic. Along with fat, it's a major reason Americans don't live as long as people in other first world countries.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
1/3 of those w/o insurance are people who live in affluent households, who don't want it because they are healthy.

It's really simple; if you want to evade health care costs, then find ways to be healthier. Hillary Clinton's plan of 'making' people healthier and eliminating paperwork sounds good.
 

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Simple is the last thing this topic is.

On some plans, being healthy can bring your insurance costs down a little. But insurance is expensive pretty much no matter what.

You can go without insurance and rely on continued health. But what if you get in an accident? Or get a disease that's not related to your "regular" health level? PS, my last doctor visit was due to a strain from shooting baskets.

And what of the people who aren't healthy?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Employers must be pissed paying so much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Simple is the last thing this topic is.

On some plans, being healthy can bring your insurance costs down a little. But insurance is expensive pretty much no matter what.

You can go without insurance and rely on continued health. But what if you get in an accident? Or get a disease that's not related to your "regular" health level? PS, my last doctor visit was due to a strain from shooting baskets.

And what of the people who aren't healthy?
I don't consider $700 expensive for a single, do you? I feel much worse for the employer who ends up paying the most.

If you are in an accident, the hospital is mandated to accept you even if you have no insurance. In fact, hospitals are covering so many illegals w/o insurance that's its putting upward pressure on medical costs. I don't know what the case is with respect to being uninsured and with a disease, but what I do know is that a lot of poor people from other countries come here for expensive surgery and pay nothing.
 

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I pay $125.00 a month through my job for a policy that would otherwise cost us $840.00 a month if I had no insurance and wanted to pay for the same policy out of pocket. I don't think that is a bad deal. We're practically covered for everything and you really can't beat paying $10.00 max pay for a doctor visit, IMO. On the otherhand, my parents are fairly unhealthy..my Dad has diabetes (but is fine...you'd never know it), my Mom has MS and has had a brain aneurisym (she's completely fine now and survived with no issues), and their insurance costs $5500.00 a month, which my Dad's job pays 100%. Shows you how it works, doesn't it....It's also interesting that if you survive a brain aneurisym, it's like surviving the chicken pox....you never have to worry about it occurring again in you life....It just doesn't happen. Aneurisym's are created before birth.
 

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I don't consider $700 expensive for a single, do you? I feel much worse for the employer who ends up paying the most.

If you are in an accident, the hospital is mandated to accept you even if you have no insurance. In fact, hospitals are covering so many illegals w/o insurance that's its putting upward pressure on medical costs. I don't know what the case is with respect to being uninsured and with a disease, but what I do know is that a lot of poor people from other countries come here for expensive surgery and pay nothing.
Not really, on both counts.

It said $4,242 for a single. $700 was just the part the employee pays. And in my state, those who aren't employed generally pay even more than the group plans cost. $5,000 per year, or whatever it is, is a lot when you're unemployed.

Sure the hospital will treat you if you break an arm. But before they pay your bills they'll take away any other assets you have. Savings, investments, whatever. In other words, they'll pay, but only after they've made you poor.

As for diseases, they'll handle emergency treatment, but not preventive treatment, and not the more expensive therapies. A disease can cost you amounts like the value of a house. Again, if you're not poor going in you will be when you leave.
 

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Lee, I've been itching for a debate on US health care for a while now. THANK YOU TO DEATH for creating this thread. Granted, I don't claim to know more than people who live in the US and who may or may not have had bad experiences with US health care, but these stats provide for some very intersting reading:

*(note info, slightly dated)

Take prostate cancer. Even though American men are more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than their counterparts in other countries, Americans are less likely to die from the disease. Fewer than one in five American men with prostate cancer will die from it, but 57 percent of British men and nearly half of French and German men will. Even in Canada, a quarter of men diagnosed with prostate cancer die from the disease. Similar results can be found for other forms of cancer. For instance, just 30 percent of U.S. citizens diagnosed with colon cancer die from it, compared with fully 74 percent in Britain, 62 percent in New Zealand, 58 percent in France, 57 percent in Germany, 53 percent in Australia, and 36 percent in Canada. Similarly less than 25 percent of U.S. women die from breast cancer, but 46 percent of British women, 35 percent of French women, 31 percent of German women, 28 percent of Canadian women, 28 percent of Australian women and 46 percent of New Zealand women die from it. The same type of results can be seen for diseases ranging from heart disease to AIDS. (source: Gerard Anderson, Varduhi Petrosyan, and Peter Hussey, Multinational Comparisons of Health Systems Data, 2002 pp 55 - 62.)

Also see editorial: http://www.mercurynews.com/opinion/ci_6112257?nclick_check=1

Given how poorly the UK especially performs in these comparisons, one could be forgiven for believing that socialised medicine rations care not by cost but rather by killing off the infirm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
^This does not surprise me given that the US has by far the best Cancer Clinics. You see people from all over the world coming here for that, especially the rich. Opponents will counter that US life expectancy and infant mortality rates are higher than average. In actuality, this has nothing to do with the healthcare system; the life expectancy is lower because of obesity (period!), and the infant mortality rate is higher because of a greater number of teen mothers in this country (which causes many more complications), as well as greater restrictions on abortion.

Cancer Mortality rates are a true indicator of how top notch hospitals are. I saw images of UK hospitals in Michael Moore's "sicko" and they look dark, old, underfunded, low-tech. No way in hell would Americans choose that system over what we have now despite the expenses. Having said that, there are innovative ways to cut costs that the presidential candidates have talked about.
 

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Nothing to do with the healthcare system? Wrong again. While you're right that fat and other factors are important, the fact that tens of millions don't have coverage plays a big part.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If our obesity rate was cut in half, the life expectancy would be well over 80.
 

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Employers must be pissed paying so much.
In the end it all comes out of the employee's pocket. In the business I run the pay scale is based on overall labor costs not wages. If non-wage labor costs go up faster than sales nobody gets a raise. The rise in healthcare costs are the main reason why wages have stagnated in this country.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
^Do your employees report their income to the gov't after health expenses to the gov't or not?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well, then that means when people report their income, it already takes into account insurance.
 

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lifestyle is what sends americans to an earlier grave than the rest of the developed world. americans are known for sedentary lifestyles and a shitty diet. plus, we are more apt to die in a car wreck or violent crime than other industrialized nations. when i was in japan, i was amazed just how many old people there were but every morning i would see loads of them out on walks.
 

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There's no easy cause for our life expectancies. Lifestyle is a big part. But it's also certain that our average lifetimes are influenced by both the good healthcare most of us get and the non/low care many get.
 
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