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What Five Major City Downtowns Do Like The Most?

  • Atlanta

    Votes: 8 8.3%
  • Dallas

    Votes: 4 4.2%
  • Houston

    Votes: 10 10.4%
  • Miami

    Votes: 12 12.5%
  • New York

    Votes: 72 75.0%
  • Philadelphia

    Votes: 29 30.2%
  • Boston

    Votes: 46 47.9%
  • Chicago

    Votes: 71 74.0%
  • Minneapolis

    Votes: 15 15.6%
  • San Francisco

    Votes: 56 58.3%
  • Los Angeles

    Votes: 17 17.7%
  • Seattle

    Votes: 35 36.5%
  • Denver

    Votes: 10 10.4%
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Blame it on...
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
What five major city downtowns do like the most in terms of: vibrancy, density, layout, activities, skyline, setting, architechture, eateries, pedestrian friendlieness, and transportation options?
 

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I love Seattle's downtown. When I lived there so many of the people I knew always complained about Seattle's downtown architecture being "derivitive".

I always thought downtown Seattle looked beautiful!
 

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born again cyclist
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JBOB said:
If Chicago's downtown had access to the ocean it would be hard to beat.
it does have access to the ocean, the port of chicago frequently has ocean going vessels loading/unloading cargo. there's even been an increase of foreign cruise ships making ports of call to great lakes cities. you've obviously never heard of the st. lawrence seaway, but it was a massive international lock and canal project that opened up all of the great lakes ports to ocean shipping back in the mid 50's. it's true that most shipping around here is intra-lake (bewteen great lakes port cities), but many foreign shipping vessels do operate on the lakes every shipping season.
 

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Steely Dan said:
it does have access to the ocean, the port of chicago frequently has ocean going vessels loading/unloading cargo. there's even been an increase of foreign cruise ships making ports of call to great lakes cities. you've obviously never heard of the st. lawrence seaway, but it was a massive international lock and canal project that opened up all of the great lakes ports to ocean shipping back in the mid 50's. it's true that most shipping around here is intra-lake (bewteen great lakes port cities), but many foreign shipping vessels do operate on the lakes every shipping season.

LOL, Port of Chicago is in Cali. You have closer contact with Canada than Europe or Japan. I'm indicating Ocean access to the outside world (within 200 miles) a major U.S. port city. :) For instance I've traveled on boat from Philly to AC To NYC and back on a boat over several days.
 

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JBOB said:
LOL, Port of Chicago is in Cali.
cali might have a port of chicago too (i don't know why they would), but i can ssure that there is a port of chicago in chicago, though most shipping traffic in southern lake michigan actually goes through indiana's ports such as burns harbor and indiana harbor (metro chicago), the port of chicago is relatively small by comparison.



JBOB said:
You have closer contact with Canada than Europe or Japan
well, duh. isn't that a bit too obvious to even bother mentioning?



JBOB said:
I'm indicating Ocean access to the outside world a major U.S. port city
i guess it all comes down to one's definition of "major", are great lakes ports major on the international scene? probably not, but it does not preclude that fact that millions of tons of wheat, steel and other commodities are shipped directly from great lakes cities to european ports every year. i leave the "major" distinction to you, but chicago, along with all other great lakes port cities are fully serviceable to international ocean-going vessles.



JBOB said:
For instance I've traveled on boat from Philly to AC To NYC and back on a boat over several days.
and you could do exactly the same thing on the lakes. a friend of my parents once took his sailboat from chicago all the way through the great lakes, through the st. lawrence seaway, across the atlantic, around the medditeranean and all the way back to chicago.


i still utterly fail to see how chicago lacks ocean access. no, it's not on the ocean, but with the construction of the st. lawrence seaway, you might as well consider the great lakes as large, far reaching extensions of the ocean. everything else is merely a petty argument about distance. if you enjoy pettty arguments, then knock yourself out; it will still do nothing to refute the fact that chicago and other great lakes cities do indeed have access to ocean-going shipping.
 

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and you could do exactly the same thing on the lakes. a friend of my parents once took his sailboat from chicago all the way through the great lakes, through the st. lawrence seaway, across the atlantic, around the medditeranean and all the way back to chicago.



Here's a list of major ports in the U.S.
http://www.bts.gov/publications/sta...rtation_statistics_2005/html/table_03_06.html

No reason in getting defensive. Chicago and the great lakes had access to the ocean since the early 1800's through the erie canal, illinois michigan canal, etc... My view on Ocean access is closer to the ocean, I think chicago is about 1000 nautical miles from the ocean on water. Maybe you shouldn't have mentioned the seaway it's too long of a route for casual fun. It could take you several weeks to a month round trip to make it to Boston or NY or Philly or D.C. where the real port cities are in the N.E. not including the others around the nation.
 

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JBOB said:
No reason in getting defensive.
what makes you believe i'm being defensive? you said that chicago lacked ocean access and all i'm doing is correcting you. that's not being defensive, it's simply getting the facts right. trust me, i'm not trying to be hostile in any way. :)




JBOB said:
Chicago and the great lakes had access to the ocean since the early 1800's through the erie canal, illinois michigan canal, etc...
not really, neither the eria canal nor the illinois michigan canal were anywhere near large enough to allow ocean goiing vessles to traverse them. ocean going vessles did not have great lakes access until the completion of the st. lawrence seaway.




JBOB said:
My view on Ocean access is closer to the ocean, I think chicago is about 1000 nautical miles from the ocean on water.
it doesn't really matter what your view is when the facts say otherwise. great lakes port cities have access to the ocean. we both know this to be true, so let's just drop the subject, ok? :)
 

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Steely Dan said:
what makes you believe i'm being defensive? you said that chicago lacked ocean access and all i'm doing is correcting you. that's not being defensive, it's simply getting the facts right. trust me, i'm not trying to be hostile in any way. :)





not really, neither the eria canal nor the illinois michigna canal were anywhere near large enough to allow ocean goiing vessles to traverse them. ocean going vessles did not have great lakes access until the compeltion fo the st. lawrence seaway.





it doesn't really matter what our view is when the facts say otherwise. great lakes port cities have access to the ocean. end of story.
Are you still whining about the term ocean access, get over the whining. Your talking about business with large seagoing vessels that don't put money in your pocket. Your talking about Corporations making billions while you most likely do not have a half a million.

I'm talking about downtowns and benefits of ocean access fun, citiy to city with a day's travel, etc.. Yeah you can get to the ocean at about 1k nautical miles from chicago but that's no fun traveling that far just to get to maine. My point in comparing Philly, NYC, to Chicago, does not have ocean access my original statement. You are so worried about the term this thread is about what a person likes about a downtown not what corporate enron ass america sees of terminology. Do not try putting my words down you made a reply I clarified it. If you can't deal with it then don't reply to someones comment or take it personally. Now I restate my original statement

If Chicago's downtown had access to the ocean it would be hard to beat. :)
 
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