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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Inspired by the other threads, When Southbank was just South Melbourne and When Southbank was just South Brisbane, I thought I would start a Sydney thread.
Circular Quay used to actually be called Semi-Circular Quay when it was first constructed in 1844 with convict labor. It was not until 1857 before it was completed with the covering of Tank Stream, the creek that ran through the city. Today it runs under Pitt Street.

Here it is in 1870. First it was a port for agricultural trade. Many wool warehouses were built to export all the wool grown in sheep farms of rural NSW at the time.



http://vrroom.naa.gov.au/print/?ID=18983

The most significant of the wool warehouses was Mort & Co Wool Shed, completed in 1869.


Phillip Street, Sydney - Circular Quay by Powerhouse Museum Collection, on Flickr

Which would later become Farmers and Graziers.

The Farmers and Graziers building at Circular Quay by State Records NSW, on Flickr


Because Circular Quay was becoming full, wool trade moved into Darling Harbour and this area had taken over most trade by the 20th century.


Darling Harbour by Powerhouse Museum Collection, on Flickr

Here's an aerial of Circular Quay in 1943, ferries and ports for ocean liners had replaced the wool trading docks, the area was becoming a business district and not a warehouse district.


http://atlas.nsw.gov.au/public/nsw/home/topic/article/sydney-1879-2010.html


Circa Dec. 1945: Repatriating PoWs, Australian Hospital Ship WANGANELLA pulls into Circular Quay - Photo Powerhouse Museum. by Kookaburra2011, on Flickr

These aerials are from the 1932 opening ceremony for the harbour bridge. You can see all the Darling Harbour trading ports quite well.


Aerial view of Sydney and the Harbour Bridge on the day of the official opening celebrations of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, 19 March, 1932 by National Library of Australia Commons, on Flickr


Aerial view of Sydney and Circular Quay on the day of the official opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, 19 March, 1932 by National Library of Australia Commons, on Flickr


Sydney and Sydney Harbour Bridge taken from North Shore, 19 March 1932 by National Library of Australia Commons, on Flickr


Sydney Harbour Bridge with HMAS Canberra in foreground taken from Farm Cove, 19 March 1932 by National Library of Australia Commons, on Flickr

It was also a major junction for ferry connections to trams.

Circular Quay by State Records NSW, on Flickr


http://www.historicphotographs.com.au/


http://www.historicphotographs.com.au/


http://www.historicphotographs.com.au/


http://www.historicphotographs.com.au/


http://www.historicphotographs.com.au/


In 1956 the rail connection to Circular Quay was completed, enabling the trams to be removed from the city.


http://www.historicphotographs.com.au/



A colour photo, from around 1950.

Sydney Cove - early 1950s by Fred-V45, on Flickr

Then something fantastic happened in 1959, the height limit was increased from 150 feet to 915 feet! Immediately the city began building skyscrapers.

1963.

1964.

Sydney Skyline by TheFlickrSkyscraper, on Flickr


1966.

Ship "Oriana" Sydney Harbour c Jan 1966 by Yvonne Thompson, on Flickr

The Opera House started construction in 1958, here was the progress by 1966.

Sydney Opera House Construction 1966 by FotoSupplies, on Flickr

1968.

Circular Quay @ night 60s by rcc1204, on Flickr


MV Belluberra, Sydney 1968 (14) by FotoSupplies, on Flickr

While Darling Harbour was still hard at work as a port.

Sydney Darling Harbour 1968 by FotoSupplies, on Flickr


1970.

Sydney Harbour looking over Circular Quay by thewebprincess, on Flickr

1971.

197108 249 Sydney Harbour by williewonker, on Flickr

1977.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/intervene/4480706633/

1980s also saw big changes to Darling Harbour, with the raised highway, redevelopment as a tourist area and removal of the old trade wharfs with their relocation to Botany Bay.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ozczecho/85631585/

1987.

http://www.bigfoto.com/pacific/australia/

1990.

Circular Quay, Sydney 1990 by Archmage01, on Flickr


1999.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/migrating_bird/6874648835/

2011.

IMG_0585 by mornnb, on Flickr

By 2020 it will look like this, with new developments in the ADPG block.
Circular Quay is quite full now, the only free space left for significant development is the site behind Customs House, and the council wants to protect the laneway there...

The remaining part of Darling Harbour's history as a trading port will be gone and redeveloped by 2020 in East Darling Harbour, now named Barangaroo.

http://www.constructiondigital.com/...ght-on-sydney-barangaroo-waterfront-project-1
 

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It's another "interesting" how much is left shot though - VD clinic on Macquaries St, Customs House, the pubs on the Loftus and Young st corners. And I prefer the old AMP to it's predecessor....
 

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When walking along the eastern side (between CQ station and the Opera House) you can see the brass markings through the pavement that show the original banks of the harbour, and shows you how much of the current promenade is actually reclaimed from the harbour... a good 10meters worth at some points in front of the Toaster.

Great pics.
 

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Sydney: World's best city
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Thanks Mornnb. I actually liked the ferry wharves of yesteryear at Circular Quay. Much better than the concrete structures that replaced them and what we have now.

Even with the Cahill Expressway, I do like the fact that they have narrowed the street and emphasized public space in front of buildings. I do think you could activate them a lot more.

Circular Quay will always be Australia's first port. :)
 

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ANother thank-you - I hadn't realised that the modern ferry wharves would have been built concurrent with the station/cahill. They were then remodelled using the existing core sturctures in the lead-up to the 2000 Olympics into what we have today.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

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Take away the Cahill and CQS is nice and minimalist. Even if it had been built, I'd expect that the run-down, semi derelict "Bradfield vision" of the station would have been demolished before the end of the 20thC to open up the city to the harbour.
 

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I'd say that it would still be here given the heritage groups of the 1960's and 1970's bent over heaven and earth to save anything of historical significance.

The only chance to pull it down would have been the Cahill Expressway.
 

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I think I'm one of few people that actually likes Circular Quay station. I think it works well with MCA and the Opera House.

I think that Bradfield vision is misguided because of the Victorian architecture... in the 1920's. We probably would have got something similar to the vestibules of St. James and Museum stations had CQ station opened in the 1920's.
 
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