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A cheeky copy of deebs excellent Melbourne Southbank thread.


South Brisbane was originaly a popular location for Aboriginals, white settlement started with land sales in 1843 (Brisbane was first settled in 1825). The railway came to the area in 1884 with a terminus at South Brisbane, and the area boomed with industry and wharves along the river.

Over time with larger ships, shipping started using facilities at Newstead, Hamilton and eventually Fishermans Island and the South Brisbane wharfs fell into disuse and were cleared in the 1960's. The area was badly in need of renewal and that came about with the current cultural precinct and Expo 88.

After Expo, and many proposals and much debate, what we now know as Southbank came into being. Recently a lot of office and residential buildings have started to spring up, and the area just seems to get better and better.



1881 Victoria Bridge looking south, this bridge was washed away by the 1893 floods


1888 an excellent aerial, South Brisbane is at the bottom


1889 viewed from near where the Captain Cook bridge is now, note the train tracks along the river front


1890 drydock, still there today and the home of WW2 frigate HMAS Diamantina. This railway serviced the wharfs area and joined the mainline through a tunnel linking it to the Wooloongabba railyards.


1893 during the great flood (much worse than 1974 or 2011), bridge half gone, it wouldn't be replaced until 1897.


1895 looking down from Spring Hill in the city. This area along the riverfront now has the museum, art gallery, state library and the gallery of modern art.


not dated, but probably late 1800's, early 1900's


1900's the new Victoria Bridge is in place


1900's a colour picture of the drydock


1900's South Brisbane Station, until 1978 the only North/South railway crossing of the river was at Indooroopilly so this station was a terminus for most South Brisbane commuters. In 1930 the standard guage came to Brisbane, so Sydney trains would terminate at South Brisbane.


1906 this area now has the Captain Cook bridge going over it. You can see South Brisbane town hall in the background. Still a familiar bulding in the suburb.


1911 Victoria Bridge looking south


1929 Cremorne theatre visible, a popular spot, although the nearby fish markets were apparantly not always the best neighbours to have


1930 the William Jolly Bridge (then known as the Grey Street Bridge) under construction


not dated, but judging by the cars about the 1920's/1930's, the southern end of the Victoria Bridge looking towards town


1950 from Town Hall


1954 from Town Hall


1968 tram at South Brisbane station


1968 tram leaving the Victoria Bridge and passing the Palace hotel. This is now the QPAC theatres


1969 Stanley St, now Southbank


probably 1960's rail tunnel, now covered by the Captain Cook Bridge and the SE Freeway


1970 new and still the present Victoria Bridge


1970 disused wharfs and warehouses are starting to be cleared


early 70's


early 70's, the Captain Cook Bridge u/c


1970's South Brisbane station


1970's South Brisbane, end of the line


1974 floods


1974 floods


1980's South Brisbane Station


1983


1984 Aerial


1985 Stanley Street


1986 getting ready for Expo 88


1988 Expo


1988 Expo


1988 Expo, when Brisbane had a monorail!


1988 QPAC and the art gallery and museum


1993 early version of Southbank


1994 William Jolly Bridge


1995 aerial



And now some modern shots for comparisons

2012 the old dry dock


2012 3 photos along Grey Street






2012
 

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Except for Adelaide.
(Just thought id get in there before hayds)
well it is a sort of interesting topic. Southbank in Brisbane, Southbank or gate in Melbourne, Darling Harbour in Sydney, the Viaduct in Auckland, are examples of the stock standard, run of the mill waterfront renewals of the late 80s and 90s, that hundreds of western cities have, even in Europe such as Liverpool. I don't mind Southbank in Brisbane though, its OK.
I remember reading about this for a uni subject a few years back, in that I think Baltimore was the first city to do this 'postmodern' leisure based stuff, and then it went all around the world. The prerequisite was a waterfront location, former industrial, close to the city. Adelaide would have done it also but we dont have a waterfront, former industrial location near the city. Like Perth and Christchurch, ours is about 12km away and in our case not the best area. We did try a couple of years ago, but we didn't meet the important prerequisite of it being close to the CBD, so the Port (Newport quays) renewal has failed a bit.

It's interesting that these developments apparently create an image of a city on the move and always changing, but Im not really sure its as simple as that.
 

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It's interesting that these developments apparently create an image of a city on the move and always changing, but Im not really sure its as simple as that.
You are correct, but the image of a city always on the move is correct for these cities. You just have to look at photos of Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane from the 50s each decade to today. These cities are the definition of on the move and ever changing.
 

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I've come across a fact sheet published by the Southbank Corporation that provides a short overview of the development of Southbank.

http://web.archive.org/web/20080719...m.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/24006/History.pdf

I'll take note of one line which sums up the need to redevelop Southbank:

Its history demonstrated a poor use of prime riverfront land in a fast-growing city.

I can understand that during the post war period, the land along riverfront was not being used as it should be effectively, but you need to keep in mind that it was one of the better locations for a port given its proximity that the central business district, and transport links i.e South Brisbane in the earlier years of Brisbane's development.
 

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Thanks for posting. I'm really enjoying these threads, quite interesting.

well it is a sort of interesting topic. Southbank in Brisbane, Southbank or gate in Melbourne, Darling Harbour in Sydney, the Viaduct in Auckland, are examples of the stock standard, run of the mill waterfront renewals of the late 80s and 90s, that hundreds of western cities have, even in Europe such as Liverpool. I don't mind Southbank in Brisbane though, its OK.
I remember reading about this for a uni subject a few years back, in that I think Baltimore was the first city to do this 'postmodern' leisure based stuff, and then it went all around the world. The prerequisite was a waterfront location, former industrial, close to the city. Adelaide would have done it also but we dont have a waterfront, former industrial location near the city. Like Perth and Christchurch, ours is about 12km away and in our case not the best area. We did try a couple of years ago, but we didn't meet the important prerequisite of it being close to the CBD, so the Port (Newport quays) renewal has failed a bit.

It's interesting that these developments apparently create an image of a city on the move and always changing, but Im not really sure its as simple as that.
I guess you called say the inner suburb of Bowden and Brompton fits this category to a degree in the current times, excluding the waterfront part. It's an area that's been mostly filled with industrial aswell as working class homes and is now transforming into a dense multi-use precinct with low-high rises apartments, cafes, office buildings, underground train station etc. Even today there is still alot of minor industries that will most likely move out as land prices continue to skyrocket.

Hindmarsh, Thebarton and Keswick will most likely follow in the future. Prime inner-city suburbs that have been neglected in the past.

We did try a couple of years ago, but we didn't meet the important prerequisite of it being close to the CBD, so the Port (Newport quays) renewal has failed a bit.
Yet up the road in Sempahore, it's improved alot in recent times which is improving it's reputation. Port Adelaide on the otherhand has hardly changed in the past decade or make that many decades, it's still one large potential hot spot that is covered in roughness. Hopefully with State Government taking over the project from Urban Construct we will finally see some major changes that will improve the Port district. Simple things like more greenery and removing ugly powerlines will make the area more attractive.
 

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March 15, 1944: Minesweeper HMAS TONGKOL at the site of the historic South Brisbane drydock [present Queensland Maritime Museum] with the magnificent clocktower of the former South Brisbane Town Hall in the background. Also the wonderful school building [correct?] beside it.





There are some details on that building [actually written by me], and I hope I've got it right, on this site:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5750301683/


Perhaps I should explain, or should keep quiet, that Bronteboy is also The Kookaburra, creator of this maritime site on Flickr in another life, space-time continuum, or whatever. Hope you like the photo, anyway, here's another, more recent, HMAS DIAMANTINA by mgjeffries from the same vantage point:





Flagship of the colonial Queensland Navy, 'flat iron' gunboat GAYUNDAH in the historic South Brisbane drydock in the 1890s. This, of course, is where the frigate HMAS DIAMANTINA sits now [since 1980].






again, by me in another life, space-time continuum '

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3810785085/
 

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^^ Great photos of the ships and drydock Bronteboy! What you've written about Cumbooquepa/Somerville House looks pretty well correct going by what I can see, with one minor exception – according to the heritage listing, the original Cumbooquepa was built for Brisbane's second mayor, Thomas Blackett Stephens. When he died, the property was passed down to his son William, who went on to become the first Mayor of South Brisbane. It was William who had the current house built, which replaced the original house that was demolished to build the railway line south.

If you're interested, here are the heritage listing for both South Brisbane Town Hall (which is actually just municipal chambers, despite it's name – a proper town hall was proposed, but couldn't be financed by the South Brisbane Municipal Council at the time) and Cumbooquepa/Somerville House.
 
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