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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've been looking for these old prints for years and finally stumbled across them.

They were taken in 1986 a few days after the announcement of plans for Southgate, just in case one day someone invented the Internet and created a forum frequented by people interested in urban planning with a passing fascination for historic images of radically transformed parts of our cities.

Where to start with their amazingness?

The view of the Yarra's south bank from FSS was very familiar. There was something particularly wonderful about the Allans Sweets neon sign, which by day way a mess of steel and wires but by night was an animated display to put a sparkle in the eye of any 10 y/o.

The red brick building was the old Australian Paper Mills factory - at least one of the never-built proposals for Southgate incorporated this building. Oh, and check out the original, stubby Arts Centre spire poking up from behind what was then the Mobil building.







The bushy riverbank and adjacent road was totally unloved and obscure - there was no reason to go there and no one ever did.





The Banana Alley vaults (north bank) being refurbished - one of the first projects to directly embrace the river, well kinda.



Note the old Gas & Fuel towers where Fed Sq is now.





Some more...







deebs
 

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Champagne Socialist
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that, is fkn awesome.

I was 4 years old when they were taken!

thanks very much for posting them!

especially love this one:



lol @ the Camira with New South plates.

totally random!
 

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Holy Mother of Shane Warne!!! That place is totally unrecognisable and resembles just an ordinary place with factories around. Hard to believe now that a promenade has taken the place of the weeds and shrub
 

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Amazing photos, Overall such an improvement, though it's a shame some adaptive re-use didnt happen in the final scheme, like all those factory shells with apartments inside next to Richmond Station,

Below are a few attempts at before and after fromm google streetview







 

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Oh ma Lordee, lookee here
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Wonderful sights - thank you, although for someone my age 1986 doesn't seem that long ago. I've got a Yarra River photo around here somewhere with the script-written 'Laconia' [Woollen Mills] neon sign down on Normanby Road just visible. I'll look it out.
 

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Oh ma Lordee, lookee here
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Further to the last message ...



Okay, it's photo of a Navy ship [WWII corvette HMAS Fremantle, 1946], down around Duke and Orr drydock where 'Polly Woodside' and the Melbourne Convention Centre is now, but the real point here is the glimpse of the 'Laconia' Woollen Mills neon sign in the background. That was on top of the well-known Laconia House [1925] on Normanby Road, which can be seen here:

http://www.realcommercial.com.au/property-industrial+warehouse-vic-south+melbourne-5866321


Now another Navy ships photo [British destroyers, HMS Contest and HMS Cockade, taken in July 1947] at No. 1 South wharf, right by Spencer St. bridge [just visible] where the Melbourne Exhibition Centre [Jeff's Shed] is now. Interest here is the glimpse of an old-style motor showroom or repair place of some type on the other side of the bridge on the road corner, where Crown Casino is now. And of course there's the Robur tea and coffee warehouse, restored and still there, but standing out on the skyline back then.

It's in many Yarra/ships photos. Of course ships like this cannot get up past the Yarra's Edge and the flyover there now [CXharles Grimes Bridge, 1975].




Well, two slightly odd choices, but I hope they have added some extra interest to your thread. The photos, by A.C. Green [1878-1954] are from the Green Collection at the State Library of Victoria, out of copyright and publicly released.
 

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the Allens chimney looks in good condition. wonder why it was allowed to be bulldozed? should have had heritage listing?
 

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The Homoeopathic Hospital (later Prince Henry’s Hospital) in 1889.
An elaborate Victorian structure made of variegated brick with extensive verandahs, parapeted gables, pinnacles, iron cresting and storeys separated by decorative banding.
Demolished in 1969.





The Moderne styled Prince Henry’s Hospital in the 1950s, built next to the former homeopathic hospital, was demolished to make way for The Melburnian apartments.



The slick Melburnian apartments.

 

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Great photos!

Wow, what a transformation. It's such a great part of Melbourne today, filled with visitors, hard to think of it as so bad back then. It seems odd now to see ships of destroyer size so far up the Yarra too.
 

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Perth's Beach
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Remarkable change. You brought the Yarra to life, a natural setting now embraced. Nimbys don’t know what the hell they’re talking about.
 

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Lord Melbourne
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Queens Bridge & Queens Wharf, Melbourne, Victoria, Mar 1898
Taken from South Melbourne looking north east.
http://museumvictoria.com.au/collec...idge-queens-wharf-melbourne-victoria-mar-1898


Similar view from google streetview these days




A reverse angle image from 1857
in the foreground you can see 'the falls', also known as Freshwater place, a bunch of rocks which prevented large ships and saltwater going upstream. It was blown up in 1883. The rocks were also used as a footbridge by some people.

Sailing ships on the Yarra River. There is a small jetty in the foreground and the ships in the background are on the far side of a small weir (the "falls"). The river appears widest on the near side of the weir and the turning basin is visible on the
right. There are two tug boats next to the nearest sailing ship.
http://museumvictoria.com.au/collections/items/795073/photograph-melbourne-victoria-1857


A similar location as above (a bit forward, queens bridge was built roughly where the falls were, you can see the turning basin on the right in front of the aquarium)




Spencer Street Ferry Wharf, Melbourne, Victoria, Mar 1898
http://museumvictoria.com.au/collec...treet-ferry-wharf-melbourne-victoria-mar-1898
Spencer Street ferry wharf on the Yarra River, Melbourne, 3 March 1898. The Adelaide Steamship Company and the tea warehouse are visible in the background. Photograph taken by Thomas Beckett.


Similar viewpoint a century later
 

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Oh ma Lordee, lookee here
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1983, with the opening of the Wolrd Trade Centre - from 'Wharves To The World: The Development of Melbourne's World Trade Centre, by Amy Zurrer, MNelbourne Books 2011.




1970s, World Trade Centre u/c towards South Melbourne waterfront. That high-rise behind 'Polly Woodside'
must have been demolished for the Melbourne Exhibition Centre. Can't recall what it was. I think that's the Laconia Wollen Mills buiulding again, just above the high-rise to the right.




192os, before the Spencer Street bridge was built, mid-Picture right. A ferry crossing here, the bridge was completed in 1930. HGard to imagine Melbourne now without it.

 

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^^ Great stuff people! :)

Two postcards of the Glaciarium that used to be on City Road, demolished to make way for Southgate.





Melbourne Glaciarium

Soon after Reid's Adelaide rink closed, a full-blown rink capable of International standard skating and ice hockey opened in Melbourne on June 9th or 11th, 1906, at South Gate near the present State Theatre. Gone was the pond-style shape of the Adelaide experiment; this was the first ice arena in Australia and the 3rd-largest rink in the world after two US rinks. Melbourne Glaciarium occupied a land area of almost an acre, or about four standard suburban residential blocks. The 2-storey building was 112m (369 ft) long by 42m (139ft) wide, with a total floor area of 9,530 square metres, or 1,036 imperial squares including elaborate office, cloakrooms, engine and boiler rooms. The ice surface was 180ft by 90ft (54.9m x 27.4m; The Argus, 23 Aug 1930, p 25), or about 1,500 square metres. The minimum size for International hockey matches at that time was reportedly 54m by 23m or 1,242 square metres; the size of the Sydney rink, built the next year, which was actually smaller than Melbourne. In 1925, "The Glassy", as it was popularly known, accommodated a grand piano in an orchestra area conducted by Frank Bladen, who had played with the Pavlova and Gilbert and Sullivan orchestras. It had seating for 2,000 people and it hired 1,500 pairs of skates. Up to 5,000 people attended hockey matches and ice and snow sports carnivals at any one time.

Known as the 'The Academy of Skating', Reid managed it initially. The first instructor was Professor Brewer, the "Professional Champion Ice Skater of the World" from Prince's Skating Rink in London, and many others followed, including Professors Claude Langley, Bobby Jackson, Jack Gordon, Lena Uksila, Henry Witte, Dawn Hunter and Felix Kaspar, an Austrian who had been interned during the war as an enemy alien. Kaspar was most-famous of all. He was World Champion in 1937 and 1938; he taught Reid's daughter, Mireylees; and he was also an instructor at Sydney Glaciarium. Other world-famous instructors included Rhona Thael and brother Cliff; Canadian gold medallist, John McKilligan and his wife; and Melbourne-born Albert Enders and his wife and skating partner Sadie. The Melbourne rink seated many thousands because it was also the first purpose-built theatre for exhibiting motion pictures in Australia; one of many such credits due to Reid's syndicate partner, British-based impresario, T J West. The Glaciarium was the first theatre in the world to ever show a true double-feature on May 15th, 1911, and Australia's first colour cinematography in February 1912.

A newsreel of the time apparently shows the first building was destroyed by fire in 1917. Its original ice pad of 1,347 square metres was dimensioned for International ice hockey and skating. If it was destroyed, its replacement (pictured above from City Road) re-opened on the same site soon after, because there was little loss of income during those years. The Argus newspaper in Melbourne reported on April 30th, 1917, "The suspension of ice-skating in Melbourne during the summer months would appear not to have diminished the popularity of the pastime, for at the opening of the season at the Glaciarium on Saturday the rink was crowded at both the afternoon and evening sessions. The rink will be open every afternoon and evening." It was managed by Leo Molloy, who continued in that role until it closed. Ice hockey, speed skating, local and International ice shows and skating exhibitions, famous bands and even circuses continued there until the outbreak of the second world war, resuming again in 1946. It was even converted into makeshift film studios in 1924-5 for the film Jewelled Nights, an adaptation of a novel by Marie Bjelke-Petersen and starring Louise Lovely (1895–1980), an Australian actress who had achieved success in Hollywood. It was home to the basketball and gymnastics competitions of the 1956 Melbourne Olympics and finally closed the year after, in 1957. It was the longest operating rink of the original indoor rink era in Australia, perhaps the world. The building was destroyed by fire on Good Friday, 1964, and this time it did not rise from its ashes. But its spirit lives on 100 years later, and considering what took place there, it is hallowed ground nonetheless. The Glaciarium was the cradle of National ice sports, a major building of National significance and, sadly, yet another of the many lost buildings of Melbourne.
 
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