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I must say, historic row-houses, high-gear gentrification, new commercial and residential develoment, and a slew of new inner-city redeveloment have certainly put Baltimore under my radar for one of the places I want to move after high school. One major drawback: their subway system is sorry for a city its size. When will b-more get a decent subway system? Or are their any plans for expansion?
 

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Baltimore has about 45 miles of Subway/LightRail in operation. Another Subway line is in the underdesign phase from Woodlawn/Security to Fells Point Canton. There is also a extension planned and also under design phase from Johns Hopkins Hosiptial Complex to Good Samaritan Hospital in North East Baltimore City. There are also two comuter rail lines one from Camden Station to Union Station and one from Perryville to Penn Station then to Union Station.
 

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Heres a poor map that I found. For the most part currently we only have the light rail and one subway line. There is an extensive bus system but i have no clue how that works :)



This is a link to the Baltimore Regional Transit Plan

http://www.baltimoreregiontransitplan.com/

This is hopefully the future for Bmore's transit. It is something that is currently in the planning and securing of funding stages. I think they hope to have everything up and running hopefully in the 2010s or so
 

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have they maxed out what they have now, or are there any booming areas that are not along that subway/rail line that need it?

looks good from what I can make out here, but there is no telling what could be improved or wasted in this scenerio.
 

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Wow that's a lot of development, the first map's got all the wrong colors for the lines. For instance, the first map shows the Yellow line terminating at Cromwell, but the second shows the Blue line terminating at Cromwell. Any timeframe?
 

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Bmore metro

With the city council in Baltimore, the timeline may be in the 27th century. The good thing is the system is light years away from what it was 10 years ago. If the council didn't drag their feet on other projects (slots, HQ hotel, new arena, Key Hwy, height limits, and many, many more) they would have time to tackle the subway.

Areas that need access are Catonsville/Ellicott City, Middle River/Essex, Cedonia, Belair, Loch Raven, Cherry Hill, and others.

Howard County has the "No Sign," "No Mass Transit," laws also known as the "Kill Every Tree With Car Emissions Law."

Getting a proper sized subway system would mean replacing everyone in the city council, and someone actually getting many other issues off the waiting list.
 

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Molo said:
With the city council in Baltimore, the timeline may be in the 27th century. The good thing is the system is light years away from what it was 10 years ago. If the council didn't drag their feet on other projects (slots, HQ hotel, new arena, Key Hwy, height limits, and many, many more) they would have time to tackle the subway.
For better or worse, the city government doesn't have anything to do with the transit situation. The authority for that was taken over by the State back in about 1970. That means that Baltimore stands in line with the needs of the rest of the state. Not good. The subway, light rail and buses are all owned by the Maryland Transit Administration, which is part of the State Department of Transportation. In my not-so-humble opinion, we would be better off with a metropolitan authority rather than competing with DC area, roads in Cumberland, a new Bay Bridge, etc.

Molo said:
Areas that need access are Catonsville/Ellicott City, Middle River/Essex, Cedonia, Belair, Loch Raven, Cherry Hill, and others.
Add to that White Marsh, Towson, etc.

Molo said:
Howard County has the "No Sign," "No Mass Transit," laws also known as the "Kill Every Tree With Car Emissions Law."
Let them choke on their own sprawl. It will be even more fun when gas gets to about $3.50.

Molo said:
Getting a proper sized subway system would mean replacing everyone in the city council, and someone actually getting many other issues off the waiting list.
Getting a decent system will mean convincing the Governor to put it in the state budget. Transit is part of the MDOT budget and that budget is created by the Governor's staff. Under the state constitution, the State legislature can not add to that budget; they can only reduce it. The city council can only stand outside the door and beg. The current situation is a function of the previous governor who basically did nothing for 8 years except convene a committee that came up with a completely cool looking but financially unrealistic "Rail Plan" (the map posted below). The current budget put up $150,000,000 state and federal bucks to add a second track to 9 miles of light rail, so as you can guess, none of this comes cheap. The best thing we have going right now is to hope for the best on the Red line, which will run from Woodlawn through downtown to Fells Point or Canton. The state budgeted $250,000,000 for design and start-up construction on that but given that they will need Federal money and that comes up in 6 year cycles, it's gonna be a while before that happens, at best. It will probably be a "Bus Rapid Transit" line; subway would run into billions and is a non-starter. 6 years later, we might be discussing an extension of the current subway out to the northeast.
 

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the second tower crane for canton tower is up. i was on another forum talking about dc and baltimore and getting bashed because we are not well represented there. it was the forum about the 4th largest city in the usa. i definately put my 10 cents worth in. hopefully they might come and take a peek.
 

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Wow, the proposal almost fooled me for a sec. The DC subway is so extensive and reminded me of its map. Is that all supposed to be heavy rail or is it going to be light rail? Mix?
 

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Furiine said:
Wow, the proposal almost fooled me for a sec. The DC subway is so extensive and reminded me of its map. Is that all supposed to be heavy rail or is it going to be light rail? Mix?
The rail plan map is a pipe dream left over from the Glendenning administration. I will sound cynical when I say this but at the time I believed (and still do) that they drew this up knowing that they wouldn't be around to see it not happen. That plan has been put on the back burner in favor of a "Transit Plan" which mainly shows the Red Line (which is being planned now) and the Green Line (extension of the current subway). The rest of it is beyond the scope of forseeable planning cycles (more than 10 years away) and is purely speculative. At this point, the Red Line options appear to be BRT, light rail, "Enhanced Bus" or nothing. Subway, being at least $500,000,000 per mile of tunnel is not being considered. At that price, the old Rail Plan would make the Big Dig seem cheap.

BRT is considerably cheaper than light rail and, if done right, could be as effective. Done wrong, Bus Rapid Transit just becomes Bus. There are currently no specifics on the Green Line, but again, subway seems unlikely due to its incredible cost.

Apparently the MTA is also considering a long overdue revision of the bus lines, many of which are descended from the long dead street car lines. One small consequence of this is a bus line that goes directly from the Falls Road light rail stop to Towson (something that should have been done in 1992). They are running this temporarily during light rail construction as one of the shuttle buses replacing the light rail but a driver informed me that they plan to keep it when the trains are back.
 

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Thanks Scando for the corrections.

But I remember an article about 4 months ago reducing the bus lines. I think some were eliminated in AA and Bmore counties. (If I'm not mistaken. I was in Philly at the time.)

I still don't see how the city has survived without connecting its suburbs. I've been in other cities can't imagine having the mass transit situation here. I remember when they charged extra for county fare. (How dumb?) Can you imagine that now?

It does, however, show how strong the city really is. Look at how Hunt Valley and Owings Mills are growing like wildfire since the Lightrail. Those areas are feeding the city. Connecting the other suburbs has to be on the table.

If Baltimore doesn't want to become a Buffalo, update the metro now!
 

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Molo said:
Thanks Scando for the corrections.

But I remember an article about 4 months ago reducing the bus lines. I think some were eliminated in AA and Bmore counties. (If I'm not mistaken. I was in Philly at the time.)
There have been a few minor changes, but in the city at least, it seems that every bus line has a bunch of people who vigorously protest. Each one of those lines has its own ecosystem and at least a couple walker-wielding grandmas who won't be able to get the the doctor if this line is moved.

Molo said:
I still don't see how the city has survived without connecting its suburbs. I've been in other cities can't imagine having the mass transit situation here. I remember when they charged extra for county fare. (How dumb?) Can you imagine that now?

It does, however, show how strong the city really is. Look at how Hunt Valley and Owings Mills are growing like wildfire since the Lightrail. Those areas are feeding the city. Connecting the other suburbs has to be on the table.

If Baltimore doesn't want to become a Buffalo, update the metro now!
The basic problem with the MTA service is that they try to be too many things. One the one hand they are go-everywhere-slowly services for some people and for others it is commuter service that people want to be speedy. What happens is that they don't do either very well. For commuters you want direct straight lines and not too many stops except in dense areas. For the grandmas and the go everywhere people you want meandering cris-cross routes that stop at every corner. Suburb to suburb service is something they have never done much of (try to get a ride from Pikesville to White Marsh).

Unfortunately, none of the current long term plans even thinks about the Pikesville to White Marsh crowd. They will be left with the Beltway, which doesn't have much room left to expand, gets a little worse each year and has no successor planned either. In short, Baltimore is like most places in the US where transportation will continue to deteriorate and planners don't have answers that budget people can deal with. IMO, living in a transit friendly community or structuring your life around a reasonable commute or living in a walkable community is an act of personal self defense.
 

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waj0527 said:
Here's a copy of the proposal for the new Baltimore Regional Transit System.

Hey bro, I don't know what to say, but if Baltimore built and had a subway like that, I would be proud that yall finally gotten your heads out your asses and built what seems to be a world-class subway. I always thought that the only thing that Baltimore had was the Inner Harbor, Camden Yards, and murder and crime. I'm real proud of that map and your system. I wish Philadelphia had a more extensive subway system aimilar to NYC, but transit over there is fucked, literally FUCKED!!! There's only subway lines, when we should be having like eight of them in our city (sorry the PATCO , the commuter lines, and the subway surface lines don't count on our subway, IMO.) The only thing I'm against is the light rail on the city streets, I'm not a light rail fan, but I'm still proud that yall pulled your heads out your asses. Now only if that system gets built.......
 

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Hmm, yeah. Seems that downtown is usually the first thing that comes to mind when one thinks of Baltimore, as far as attractions go. There's really more to it than that. You could do just about everything in the inner harbor in maybe 2-3 days, but it would take you at least another week to see everything else that is happening around town. Baltimore's roads are just ugly little things. Can't argue with that. I-170 was a dismal failure, being as it was left incomplete and didn't really act as much of a catalyst to the blighted west side. Going back 50 years, if Baltimore had almost no highways running through it except maybe I-95 and parts of I-83, yet built a subway, it would really be doing much better. As for the crime rate, it seems to be declining nicely while neighborhoods are being heavily renovated. Only time will tell..
 

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Furiine said:
I-170 was a dismal failure, being as it was left incomplete and didn't really act as much of a catalyst to the blighted west side. Going back 50 years, if Baltimore had almost no highways running through it except maybe I-95 and parts of I-83, yet built a subway, it would really be doing much better. As for the crime rate, it seems to be declining nicely while neighborhoods are being heavily renovated. Only time will tell..
Back in the 60's there was a plan to bring I 70, 93 and 95 all right into the city and intersect them. Problem was that roads would merge right downtown at the site of today's Inner Harbor. A little of 70 was built resulting in the destruction of hundreds of houses. The big merge downtown would have brought 95 up from DC through the Federal Hill area, they were going to actually tear down the hill itself and bridge across the harbor, cutting off boat traffic. The huge interchange would have also required the sacrifice of Fells Point and Canton; where Harborplace and Harbor East are now would have been on-ramps (see http://www.roadstothefuture.com/EW_Expwy_Harbor_Route_L.jpg. Fortunately neighborhood opposition stopped this malignantly grandiose plan. Thankfully, the only thing built was that orphaned mile of 70 that dead-ends in West Baltimore. Some relevant documents are posted on http://www.roadstothefuture.com/ , which also has a map of the original subway plan from back then (I wish the HAD built that).
 

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This would have been an absolute disaster for the city. No inner harbor, no fells point, no camden yards.. Federal Hill and Canton would never have had any reason for redevelopment. Thank God this never hapened.

 

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The great catalyst for Baltimore will be when their metro line connects with DCs.......especially at BWI airport...then you're talking about very serious intermingling of 7-8 million people.....EXample.........live in Tysons Corner VA......work in Baltimore....or whatever......
 
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