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What does it matter, the world's Oil Equivalent Fossil Fuels could last us for another 500 years.

Oil Shale, Coal, Gas etc.

And even plastics are now being made from things such as corn.


In Nigeria we won't even be sweating.

We have more Gas than Oil and Coal to sweaten the meal. Oil will not be missed.
 

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There are a potential 2 trillion barrels of oil shale in the US alone.

But the problem is that extracting it is incredibly dirty (like the Alberta oil sands) and the costs are high.
Costs of converting Gas to Gasoline/Diesel is not high as far as I am aware.
 

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I think alternative means of clean energy is growing in popularity and I think with science it will be a matter of time that it becomes an economically viable option. I seriously believe 20 years from now our energy will come from diverse means and those sustainable cleaner forms will compose a larger share of our consumption which is great for our planet! :cheers:

Oil will still be important but not as much as it is today.
 

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There are a potential 2 trillion barrels of oil shale in the US alone.

But the problem is that extracting it is incredibly dirty (like the Alberta oil sands) and the costs are high.
True, Morocco for example has also oil shale ( 50 billion barrels), but the problem is that it cost a lot of energy and water to produce oil from oil shale...
 
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They still haven’t tapped in Africa’s full potential still. It is estimated the Puntland region in Somalia has 10 billion barrels of Oil alone. Now imagine the whole East Africa coast from Eritrea, Ethiopia to Mozambique
 

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Here is an interesting article about Canada's future potential:

Hotter globe gives Canada boost in 2050


Jameson Berkow, Financial Post · Saturday, Sept. 25, 2010

Laurence Smith figures most of the world will be dealing with epic problems in 40 years.

And the geography professor at University of California, Los Angeles, explains just what they'll be in his cautionary tale The World in 2050: Four Forces Shaping Civilization's Northern Future.

Nonetheless, the greenhouse gas expert paints a surprisingly positive future for eight countries lying above the 45th parallel, which he calls NORCs or "The New North" depending on the chapter.

The eight -- the United States, Scandinavia, Russia, Iceland, and Canada in particular -- stand to reap the benefits of a warming world.


"Given the four forces that I describe, put them all together on the grand scale and of those eight NORC countries, Canada is in many ways positioned the best as far as the arguments of this book go," said Prof. Smith in an interview.

It isn't just the effects of climate change that Prof. Smith uses to forecast Canada's future as a political and economic powerhouse.

Our forward-thinking immigration policy, population growth patterns and immense natural resources all count as reasons the academic-turned-author is padding his investment portfolio with Fidelity Canada.

The rest of the planet will contend with population explosion, limited resources, globalization and climate change while the melting polar ice caps will provide Canada and other NORC countries with access to vast Arctic reserves of oil and natural gas. Today they remain locked under an impenetrable layer of ice and permafrost.

The author points to a 2009 assessment by the United States Geological Survey that suggests nearly a third of the world's undiscovered natural gas and 13% of its undiscovered oil lies north of the Arctic Circle.

Then there are the Alberta oil sands.

Prof. Smith expects oil production there will increase from 1.3 million barrels per day in 2008 to 3.5 million by 2018, finally reaching six million barrels per day by 2040.

The oil sands alone contain 175 billion barrels of oil, writes Prof. Smith, not even counting what could be realized from a melting Arctic.

In 2050, Canadian oil production will be the second largest in the world, bested only by that of Saudi Arabia.

A less frozen Arctic will also give Canada a trade advantage. The book places Churchill, Man. -- northern Canada's only deepwater seaport -- as No. 2 in a Top 10 list he calls 'Ports of the Future'.

"Churchill is not going to turn into the Port of L.A., I can tell you that," joked Prof. Smith. "But the ice is going to go away and so the potential will be there."

In the four years he spent writing the book, Prof. Smith joined the crew of the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Amundsen for part of its long voyage through the Arctic. That gave him key insights into Canadian culture, which are reflected positively in the book. "American icebreaker cruises are dry. But the Canadians open a beer bar two days a week," he writes in his book.

Though it offers some surprisingly uplifting benefits of climate change, the book makes it clear those are exceptions.

Indeed, the book takes great care to highlight the dramatic toll rising global temperatures will have on virtually everybody else. Fresh water will be scarce. And the greatest mass extinction of wildlife since the dinosaurs disappeared will occur. However, Canada's freshwater supply is expected to increase, as will the diversity of its wildlife as plants and animals migrate north.

Wildlife will not be the only migrants seeking residence in the New True North. Prof. Smith expect's Canada's population to jump by more than 30% by mid-century, which he attributes to our skills-focused immigration policy. Meanwhile, Japan will lose 20% of its population and Russia will become 17% smaller as median ages rise.

"In an aging world, those countries best able to attract skilled foreign workers will fare best," he writes.
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Read more: http://www.nationalpost.com/todays-...a+boost+2050/3577654/story.html#ixzz156h7QbKv
 

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Although the Arctic has lots of potential as far as resources are concerned, it is especially vulnerable to resource exploitation.

Further south, those Alberta oil sands are pretty much a mess as far as environment is concerned. They get the oil open-mine style and use lots of water which is so poisoned that they create massive lakes nearby which may have poisoned many people. Al Jazeera did a good piece on the oil sands a while ago. We have to dig deeper and more harder to live our lives it seems.
 

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Is that suppose to be good news...no body benefits from global warming, we will all pay the price for it eventually, its a matter of who suffers first....
 

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Gas to liquids (GTL) is a refinery process to convert natural gas or other gaseous hydrocarbons into longer-chain hydrocarbons such as gasoline or diesel fuel. Methane-rich gases are converted into liquid synthetic fuels either via direct conversion or via syngas as an intermediate, for example using the Fischer Tropsch or Mobil processes.

It is cost effective.
Nigeria is going to be an energy Giant for a very long time. :banana:

here is the Pearl GTL facility in Qatar



They have already used the technology successfully.
 

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The oil time is over. Herman Scheer a renewable energy expert said investing in oil and gas now is waste of money. Energy from wind and solar is going to become as cheap or cheaper than energy from oil, gas, coals etc in the comming years.
5 years ago solar energy costed 50 cent per KWH and now it is 15 cent per KWH and the price is decreasing every year. Also the price of solar panels is getting cheaper and cheaper, because China is producing them more cheaper than western countries..
 

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^^ Fossil Fuels and Solar energy are very different.

Fossil Fuels like Oil, Gas and coal and every other fuel source are actually a bi-product of solar energy. Without solar energy there would be no oil or gas etc.

So Solar energy is not something that can ever replace every every fuel source out there. Solar energy is a very broad term.

Fossil Fuels are a more versatile fuel source.

Solar energy cannot be used for petrochemicals such as detergents, fertilizers, medicines, paints, plastics, synthetic fibres, and synthetic rubber.

Fossil fuels can do things that Solar cannot do such as create the products I mentioned above. 15% of Oil is not used for fuel, but rather for the production of plastics.

Solar energy conversely is simply a more abundant and more efficient fuel source.

So Solar energy can never replace fossil fuels. It can reduce its market share however.

Also Solar energy is not at the level of advancement at this time that it can even do that (reduce the market share of fossil fuels significantly). Solar panels are just drop in the ocean. Fuel powered cars, whether it be Gasoline, Diesel, Gas or even Hydrogen are more efficient and far more advanced than Solar cars for example.

Transportation is a major part of energy use and building energy usage (Commercial or Residential) is just one part of the market.

Renewable energy sources will not be making significant headway into the market for a very long time.
 

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They still haven?t tapped in Africa?s full potential still. It is estimated the Puntland region in Somalia has 10 billion barrels of Oil alone. Now imagine the whole East Africa coast from Eritrea, Ethiopia to Mozambique
a pilot once told me almost the same thing, the Eastern coast of africa is full of unexplored barrels of petroleum, yeah we r rich lol :D
 

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I think alternative means of clean energy is growing in popularity and I think with science it will be a matter of time that it becomes an economically viable option. I seriously believe 20 years from now our energy will come from diverse means and those sustainable cleaner forms will compose a larger share of our consumption which is great for our planet! :cheers:

Oil will still be important but not as much as it is today.
that's your answer right there the question is what happens when we find a cheaper alternative to fuel ....thou i believe the oil countries+companies and car manufactures won't let that happen anytime soon:cheers:
 

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that's your answer right there the question is what happens when we find a cheaper alternative to fuel ....thou i believe the oil countries+companies and car manufactures won't let that happen anytime soon:cheers:
But many car companies are already adapting to accommodating with the environmental concerns of the public. In Brazil more than half the cars produced are flex fuel (can take both ethanol and gasoline) while in the U.S you have the huge success of the prius, Toyota will another electric car in the market in 2011 and even GM is getting on the act.

But while the car industry may be lagging a big we don't see that so much with clean energy as a whole. Look how much China is investing in alternative means, something like $500 bn. Still a long way to go but other sources of more environmentally clean options are gaining ground and it's no question that in 20 years the world will look a very different place on how we satisfy our energy needs.
 
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