Skyscraper City Forum banner
1 - 20 of 52 Posts

·
Moderator
Joined
·
17,944 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
LA is one city in the US where its doesn't have a defined downtown. While NY's city centre is concentrated around Manhattan and Chicago, the loop, LA's urban sprawl has several centres. Downtown LA is considered a main CBD but its not "THE" place where most Angelenos head to.

Anyway, what do you think? Where to you mark the boundary between LA's city centre and suburbs or LA's inner core and outer?
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
17,944 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Here's how I see it. LA's city core or city centre would start from Downtown LA particularly within the Union Station. The city centre would also include Hollywood, Westwood, Century City, the Melrose area, Venice Beach, Marina Del Rey, the area within LAX and Miracle Mile. The city core also includes the cities of West Hollywood, Beverly Hills, Culver City and Santa Monica. The city core to some extent can include South LA, Long Beach, the areas of Manhattan and Redondo Beach, Gardena, Compton and Carson.

LA's suburbs would be The San Fernando Valley, Glendale, The Foothills, Orange, San Bernardino and Ventura Counties.
 

·
Avant Garde
Joined
·
3,807 Posts
Downtown is everything inside the 101, 110, and the 10 freeways. Some people might dispute that the western portion of downtown should include MacArthur Park but I dunno.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
610 Posts
We do have a defined downtown its just not really considered the "city centre"....yet....LA Live, LA Central, Grand Ave, Broadway Revitilization, etc will change that...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
LA's suburbs would be The San Fernando Valley, Glendale, The Foothills, Orange and Ventura Counties.
I see those as the suburbs too, and that pretty much covers all the suburbs...
However you need to include San Gabriel Valley, as you basically left out everything east of Downtown LA. I view the SGV as pure suburb by definition.

Everyone keep forgetting the SGV exists, they will mention places not even within LA County, but leave out the SGV that is actually part of LA County
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
17,944 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I see those as the suburbs too, and that pretty much covers all the suburbs...
However you need to include San Gabriel Valley, as you basically left out everything east of Downtown LA. I view the SGV as pure suburb by definition.

Everyone keep forgetting the SGV exists, they will mention places not even within LA County, but leave out the SGV that is actually part of LA County
Thank for giving me the actual name, San Gabriel Valley. I mentioned the "Foothills" earlier which includes the cities and towns in the eastern part of LA County like San Dimas, Pomona, West Covina, El Monte, Industry and so on.

East LA would still be considered as part of the city core or city centre. But once you're in Monterrey Park its suburban
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
Thank for giving me the actual name, San Gabriel Valley. I mentioned the "Foothills" earlier which includes the cities and towns in the eastern part of LA County like San Dimas, Pomona, West Covina, El Monte, Industry and so on.

East LA would still be considered as part of the city core or city centre. But once you're in Monterrey Park its suburban
Yeah there is a few cities in the San Gabriel Valley which are in foothills, but the majority of the cities is in a valley. It is vary similar to San Fernando Valley in that aspect, and actually, both of those valleys have "foothill" cities along the edges

and yes, i agree that East LA is urban/city-core and Monterrey Park is suburban
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
it will be nice to have a map labeling the city core / city centre, and labeling the suruban areas. probably work best to have them marked as shaded areas. It also might be a useful map for use on Wikipedia articles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts

http://militantangeleno.blogspot.com/2008/03/journey-to-center-of-townorthe-militant.html

Start using this in your everday life and correct people when they say echo park is the eastside.
I have ALWAYS viewed the west and east sides being on either side of the city center, even since I was a kid. I didn't even need a map to know that!

I have always viewed "downtown" as the "between" of the two sides, I don't know, it just seem logical to me.

Do people really think Los Angeles has no center? Because this is the first I ever heard of such a ridiculous concept.

Echo Park is literally west of downtown (well, in reality it is more north then it is west, but it is by far not east)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
from that link you provided kidA, I made my way over to http://la.metblogs.com/2008/03/10/it-never-dies-the-eastside-debate/ and saw that the majority of people voting in that poll voted La Cienega and La Brea as "lines" dividing the two "sides". When I read that, I got so outraged, they did not even allow the possibility that there is a central core that is between the two sides... but then I tried thinking why they thaoght that way.

Personally, I 110% agree with the definition in your provided link, that includes a "center".

I think I now understand why people try to call La Cienega and La Brea as possible "lines" dividing the west and west side, basically it all has to do with race. White people are west of La Cienega or La Brea, and "everyone else" (mostly Mexicans, Asians) is outside of the "Westside". Therefore downtown gets incorrectly categorized with the eastside because the Westsideans do not want downtown included in their precious region.

But Thank to good some of us actually view a "center", and La Cienega to LA River is part of that "center"

Sometimes I wish I was not white, my own people make me mad :eek:hno:
 

·
L O S A N G E L E S
Joined
·
6,590 Posts
This, is the suburbs!​
Michael Ritter / Associated Press​
Twin tornadoes touch down Thursday near March Air Force Base in Riverside. The funnels caused power outages, derailed a train, and flipped a big rig truck forcing the 215 Freeway to close, but no injuries were reported.​
LAT​
 

·
Silver Lake
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
Here's how I see it. LA's city core or city centre would start from Downtown LA particularly within the Union Station. The city centre would also include Hollywood, Westwood, Century City, the Melrose area, Venice Beach, Marina Del Rey, the area within LAX and Miracle Mile. The city core also includes the cities of West Hollywood, Beverly Hills, Culver City and Santa Monica. The city core to some extent can include South LA, Long Beach, the areas of Manhattan and Redondo Beach, Gardena, Compton and Carson.

LA's suburbs would be The San Fernando Valley, Glendale, The Foothills, Orange, San Bernardino and Ventura Counties.
I love this topic and one of the reasons why LA is so terribly interesting to me.

I was with you up until you began to include South LA, Redondon Beach, Long Beach and the like. You were on the right track it seemed but then you fell back into largely claiming way too much even when density levels have dropped to such an extent that no other city on the planet would include those places as part of its urban core.

LA's urban core IMO runs loosely from Downtown(possibly encompassing Boyle Heights) westward to Santa Monica. From the Hollywood Hills at the base to roughly the I10 as a good demarcation line. Others say down to Slauson which is fine but I like the 10 as a very clear and psychological barrier. The legs of the urban core seem to have lately stretched into the eastern part of the SFV and east of Boyle Heights into East LA. I like to think of Long Beach as its own entity and it should get its due as having an orbit of its own.

Discuss.
 

·
city driver
Joined
·
469 Posts
the difficult thing is that there are areas that are purely suburban within that "mountains/110/river/ocean" area. I think the "urban core" is really just from like san pedro st. to wilton or western, from temple to pico. Everything outside of that doesn't feel traditionally urban, more like overgrown suburbs (comparable to inner Houston).
 

·
LAL | LAD | LAK
Joined
·
6,477 Posts
^ But the density picks up once you reach the Miracle Mile and continues all the way to Santa Monica.
 

·
Bleed Dodger Blue
Joined
·
1,773 Posts
I'd include Culver City as a part of the city center, and that's certainly south of the 10, at least downtown Culver City.

As for Glendale, I have a REALLY hard time calling that a suburb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
In coparison to more traditional cities, this is how I would carve LA up.

The City limits would include the eastern SFV (everything east of the 405), From East LA to the east and to west it would go to the border with Beverly Hills, would include West Hollywood, everything to the immeadiate south and west of Beverly hills to the 405 (including Westwood and Century City) and would only include West Los Angeles, Venice, Marina del Rey, Westchester and the airport west of the 405. Everything to the south of downtown including all of current city boudaries with the additions of; Culver City, Ladera Hts, View Park, Windsor Hills, Inglewood, Lawndale, Gardena, Compton, Willowbrook, Lynwood, Athens, South Gate, Walnut Park, Florence, Huntington Park, Cudahy, Bell, Maywood and Commerce. I am curious what the population would be for such a combination.

Parts of LA that would be broken off into suburbs would be;
Brentwood
Pacific Palisades
entire portion of SFV west of the 405

Beverly Hills would remain distinct and considered a large satellite city. Beverly Hills would be merged with Holmby Hills and Bel Air.

As for the CBD, I would say it would include the current downtown stretching westward to include Macarthur Park, Koreatown and Hollywood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
1 - 20 of 52 Posts
Top