Skyscraper City Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Why did Britain never embrace this style? Yes, I know all about Christopher Wren/ St. Pauls/ some country houses etc., but why was it never embraced in the way it was in Italy/ the Holy Roman empire, etc.?
Was it anything to do with Catholicism? Or anti-European-ism? It's a real shame to me, as it is probably the most beautiful style of architecture ever made!
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
22,437 Posts
European Baroque was as its height during the years when England was ruled by Cromwell. That goes some way to explaining why it was never as big of an influence as it was in other countries, the style was also refined for English tastes and eventually gave way for Palladianism.

It was revived by the Edwardians though, and we have some stunning Edwardian Baroque buildings in the UK.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
Germany and the Netherlands (and plenty of other territories) had protestant reformations but embraced Baroque with gusto - I'm not sure if it's considered that there's a significant of a connection there.

I wrote a portion of my dissertation on the idea of Palladianism in England as being the Whig/Hanoverian (i.e. protestant) ideal in architecture. Not 100% sure of what my conclusions were as I haven't been able to bear reading it in full since (I wrote it in a mad 10 day rush and I refer to Inigo Jones throughout as Indigo Jones :doh:) but I think essentially now it's considered something of a myth and that Tories (Jacobites) and Whigs alike couldn't get enough of it.

Basically I think the answer to the OP is that Britain/England had always just been more immune to the trends on the continent and more prone to doing it's own thing.
 

·
Hipster Scum
Joined
·
5,613 Posts
Well that's the problem with Victorian buildings, they are often a mish-mash of various influences, so it can be hard to classify them. The City Chambers for the most part is Neo-Baroque, specifically Spanish influenced as is Kelvingrove museum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well that's the problem with Victorian buildings, they are often a mish-mash of various influences, so it can be hard to classify them. The City Chambers for the most part is Neo-Baroque, specifically Spanish influenced as is Kelvingrove museum.
Thanks for the posts guys- I know there is Edwardian revival/ some influence in Victorian architecture, but I'm referring more to the original style, I.e the Christopher Wren style.

I know there are some country manors built in Baroque style, I.e Blenheim palace and Castle Howard, but I'm referring more to why the original style wasn't built a great deal in our city centres. For example like how it's prevalent in cities such as Dresden or Prague.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
22,437 Posts
Thanks for the posts guys- I know there is Edwardian revival/ some influence in Victorian architecture, but I'm referring more to the original style, I.e the Christopher Wren style.

I know there are some country manors built in Baroque style, I.e Blenheim palace and Castle Howard, but I'm referring more to why the original style wasn't built a great deal in our city centres. For example like how it's prevalent in cities such as Dresden or Prague.

The comparison doesn't really work. Most British cities beyond London were not as large or wealthy as places such as Prague or Dresden in the 17th and early 18th century. The issue I mentioned earlier regarding Cromwell also explains its lack of impact. Castle Howard for example started construction some 30 years after the emergence of Baroque in continental Europe, other architects were altering Baroque to suit English tastes, resulting in building like Blenheim. By this time tastes were already changing and Palladianism and later Georgian became more popular and fashionable, so the window of opportunity in regard to Baroque in England was very small.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
If you're talking Wren/English Baroque style then there's a fair bit actually outside of London. Some other examples, alongside St Phillips in Birmingham which has already been mentioned are St Ann's in Manchester (1712) -



Which at one time was decorated with classical urns and a large wooden steeple, the latter of which was damaged and removed because of an earthquake.



Bluecoat School Liverpool 1718



Townhouses in Queen Square, Bristol - 1700 onwards

 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top