SkyscraperCity banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
lagom
Joined
·
1,537 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok Here in the US we have states then they are broken down into counties.
Ontario has Counties and Regions. Are'nt they the same thing really and why not just call them all counties or call them all Regions and be done with it.

Why is it a mix of heres a county and heres a region and then oh heres another county.... Whats the reasons behind this it baffles me and I cant sleep ever again till I figure this out and yes im bored at work and have way too much time on my hands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,288 Posts
In rural areas, are they not called RMs? At least here in Manitoba where numerous small towns form an RM (rural municipality)...and instead of county sheriffs, we have RCMP detachments...

Ottawa, for instance used to be in Carlton county (ie: Ottawa-Carlton Police), and Hamilton was/is in Wentworth County...Hamilton/Wentworth...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,545 Posts
Hamilton used to be Hamilton Wentworth county which included Ancaster, Barton, Beverly, Binbrook, Dundas, Flamborough, Glanford, Hamilton, Saltfleet, Stoney Creek, Waterdown, and finally Wentworth.

We would have stuff like Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board.

Terry Cooke was our last Hamilton-Wentworth Regional Council. Think of him as Prime Minister. Then we had mayors also has ward clerks.

Then in 2000 all the suburbs merged with Hamilton and got rid of Hamilton-Wentworth and became City of Hamilton.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
261 Posts
I'm not an expert on this but here's what I've gathered...

Cities that are in regions share things like police, road maintenance, waste management, by-law enforcement, etc. For example, Kitchener, Waterloo, and Cambridge all share the same police force (region of Waterloo police).

But cities that are in counties don't share those services with the other cities in their county. For example, Windsor has its own police force and road maintenance people, and every other municipality in its county does as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,767 Posts
For one thing, counties are rather historic and outdated delinations. Upper tier delinations are determined by their level of responsibility. Counties have more responsibilities than Districts, but less than Regions.





KGB
 

·
SSLL
Joined
·
8,354 Posts
It is strange, but either way, counties and regions (short for regional municipalities) are the same thing. York Region used to be York County. I believe Québec and Ontario (and NS?) are the only provinces with a country system. Rural municipalities are just really big municipalities that group rural areas' services together.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
261 Posts
It is strange, but either way, counties and regions (short for regional municipalities) are the same thing.
They're clearly not the same thing, just look at the differences in services between counties and regions.
 

·
SSLL
Joined
·
8,354 Posts
What are the difference in services between neighbouring counties and regions, like Dufferin County and Peel Region? Please enlighten me.
 

·
Registered Idiot
Joined
·
1,671 Posts
From Wikipedia

Backround

In the Canadian province of Ontario, there are three different types of census divisions: single-tier municipalities, upper-tier municipalities (which can be regional municipalities or counties) and districts. They differ primarily in the services that they provide to their residents.

The varying structures of municipal and regional governments in Ontario can sometimes be confusing, as they result from a variety of approaches to local government, implemented at different times by different provincial governments in specific areas to serve specific needs. Due to the vast disparities among Ontario's different regions, it would be extremely difficult for a provincial government to apply a consistent, unified system across the entire province.

In some cases, as well, a census division may retain its historical name even if it changes government type (eg. Oxford County, Haldimand County, Norfolk County and Prince Edward County are no longer counties even though they retain "county" in their name; Oxford is a regional municipality and the others are single-tier municipalities.)

These divisions are used by Statistics Canada to aggregate census data. A smaller municipality within a census division is called a census subdivision.




Regional Municipality

Regional municipalities (or regions) are upper-tier municipalities that generally have more servicing responsibilities than the counties. They generally provide the following services: maintenance and construction of arterial roads, transit, policing, sewer and water systems, waste disposal, region-wide land use planning and development, as well as health and social services.

Regions are typically more urbanized than counties. Regional municipalities are usually implemented in census divisions where an interconnected cluster of urban centres forms the majority of the division's area and population. Regional municipalities which consisted of a single dominant centre and its suburbs became single-tier municipalities; those which were not so clearly dominated by a single municipality retained regional municipality status. Although Oxford County and the District Municipality of Muskoka are not titled as such, they are both legally considered Regional Municipalities under Part 1, Section 1 of the Ontario Municipal Act



Single-tier municipalities

A single-tier municipality is a census division which is governed by one municipal administration, with neither a county or regional government above it, nor further municipal subdivisions below it (cf. independent city). A single-tier municipality is either a former regional municipality or a former county, whose municipal governments were amalgamated in the 1990s into a single administration. A single-tier municipality should not be confused with a separated municipality, which is a municipality that is administratively separated from its county, but is not considered a separate census division.

A single-tier municipality which is predominantly urban in nature may also be referred to as a megacity. Single-tier municipalities of this type (Toronto, Ottawa, Hamilton and Greater Sudbury) were created where a former regional municipality consisted of a single dominant urban centre and its suburbs.



Counties

Counties have fewer responsibilities than regions, as the lower-tier municipalities (cities, towns, villages, townships) within the counties typically provide the majority of municipal services to their residents. The responsibilities of county governments are generally limited to the following: maintenance and construction of arterial roads, health and social services, and county land use planning. Counties are only found in Southern Ontario.

Counties may be as large as regional municipalities in population, but their population density is generally lower (although not as low as in a district.) Counties may include major cities, such as London, Kingston and Windsor, but these cities have generally not evolved into urban agglomerations with other communities, as in regions and "megacities".

Counties may also include separated municipalities, communities that are considered part of the county for census purposes but are not administratively connected to the county. Municipalities are separated when regional or single-tier status is not appropriate for the municipality's population patterns, but their population is still large enough that it may adversely affect the county's ability to provide services to its smaller communities.


District

Districts are regional areas in Northern Ontario, but these are simply territorial boundaries that do not serve any municipal government purpose. Many of these districts are comprised primarily of unincorporated lands. Some districts may have District Social Service Administration Boards, which are designed to provide certain social services, but they do not serve a governmental function.

In a district, all services are provided either by the local municipality or directly by the provincial government. Much of Northern Ontario is sparsely populated, so a county government structure would not be an efficient or cost-effective method of administration. Only one census division in Northern Ontario, the City of Greater Sudbury, has a local government which offers county-type services.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
847 Posts
samsonyuen said:
It is strange, but either way, counties and regions (short for regional municipalities) are the same thing. York Region used to be York County. I believe Québec and Ontario (and NS?) are the only provinces with a country system. Rural municipalities are just really big municipalities that group rural areas' services together.
Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island have (or have had) county divisions. The latter three have seen little to no change in their borders. Quebec's tier structure was entirely reorganized about a quarter century ago. Ontario has spent the past half century restructuring the government and nomenclature of it's county areas, but except for the division of Ontario county between Durham and Simcoe, most border alterations have been minor.
 

·
The Mighty.
Joined
·
3,184 Posts
To answer the question:

Because Canada is wonky. I live in a county, after my county comes a municipality, and then two more counties after that the farther North you travel.
Inside my county used to be townships which were cool with me...now we have the city and all the towns which consume MASSIVE ammounts of land and it's all disgusting and makes no sense. You can travel into Windsor from the South (Tecumseh) make a giant 'L' to the East and still come out in Tecumseh on the other side. You probably have NO idea what I'm talking about, and to tell you the truth neither do I.
How about we just stick to simplicity the old school British and French ways...shall we?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,596 Posts
A lot of today's regions and counties have become what they are today because of downloading in 1998, but that is only for areas like the NEW city of Hamilton, Municipality of Chatham-Kent (formerly Kent County and the city of Chatham), the NEW city of Kingston(which took up all of the former Frontenac County), City of Brant County (which, IMO, is extremely retarded), and the NEW city of Ottawa(taken up all of Ottawa-Carleton Regional Municipality), among others. Also, a lot of former major highways, formerly maintained by the province of Ontario, were downloaded and given to local control and as a result, a lot of roads have gone to crap. I don't know if Ontario is trying to become like New York State, with large area towns instead of townships, and have counties, and cities as the county seats. I know Michigan still uses townships, at least around the Detroit area. I really don't know what the difference is between Regional Muncipalities and counties, maybe being a regional municipality having suburban towns/cities surrounding the county seat maybe being on your side and getting along better, or having a county, where the county seat or largest city in the county and the other towns against you or something. Just crazy thoughts. It's really weird how this county/RM crap works.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top