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The City
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is by all means not an attempt to attack Miami, or to create one of those immature versus threads.

But I ask this question based on the fact that Chicago is clearly a much larger city than Miami, has more business importance, and certainly has a larger collection of both wealthy and middle-class people.

Chicago's high-rise boom still hasn't fully matured in my mind, although it is quite phenomenal. However, it is still trumped by the whirlwind of construction that is hitting Miami. Does anybody have any thoughts about this?

If it were an issue of space and the price of land, I would only refer you to New York, which is still having the biggest boom. If it is an issue of weather, we can probably site many coastal cities with warm weather that aren't booming as well as Chicago or Miami are.

What is up with this, and will this trend continue? (again, please no trolling and no fighting)
 

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Its basically Miami has no choice but to build up. There is no place for exurbs in south east corner of florida as the growth boundry has been reached heading west towards the Everglades.
 

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The City
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
oshkeoto said:
Miami's population is also growing faster than Chicago's, no?
^I don't know.

The dynamics of population and growth in Miami and Chicago are very different.

Chicago is older and much, much more mature. It has several generations of well-developed suburban rings, and it thrives despite the competition they have provided to the city for several decades. Chicago is starting to enter a symbiotic relationship with its suburbs. Miami is also not that new, but its big growth spurt is relatively new, with a growing economy that has a long ways before reaching maturity--thus its growth is on the steeper portion of the curve than Chicago's is. Immigration is Miami's greatest fuel, although all major cities, including Chicago, depend on it for growth.

So the question is, who is buying up Miami's condos/apts. Miami residents, Miami suburbanites, or people from other parts of the region/state/nation?
 

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Chicago's #1 Fan
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To be honest, i could care less if Miami is building more than Chicago. My concern lies with quality not quantity. I don't think that I'd particularly like something being built in Miami here in Chicago. Yes, we did go through a bad building phase (thank you so very much Mr. Lowenberg), but things have greatly improved as you've seen by some of the recently released design proposals.
 

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Hmmmm. Skyscrapers.com lists Miami with having 342 tall buildings and Chicago with 1,492. And how many are in Miami proper and how many on the beach?
 

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oshkeoto said:
Miami's population is also growing faster than Chicago's, no?

Miami Metro Growth 1990-2000 683,798
Chicago Metro Growth 1990-2000 917,720

This is a comparison thread.

Only 6 other metros had more people moving into them: NYC, LA, Dallas-FTW, Houston, Atlanta and Phoenix.

I think Miami has a lot of money coming in from its strong connections with the the other Americas.
 

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Miami's high-boom may be skyrocketing at leap-and-bound but may be more vulnerable should the real estate cycle comes to end. Chicago tends to have a nice balance between residential/hotel and office high-rise boom. Hence, there are some serious discussion on office high-rise proposal such as 300 N LaSalle, West Loop area.
When the worst comes, other cities with 100% residential high-rise boom will experience crash more than Chicago (even NYC). IMO
 

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The City
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Chicago3rd said:
Is it just me or does TUP seem to always be bringing up possible Chicago short comings?
^Floating in Chicago la-la land is nice, but it's always important to identify ways Chicago can improve itself, and often comparison to other places is necessary to gage this

So in other words, its just you
 

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born again cyclist
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miami is building more high-rises than chicago because their is a greater demand for high-rises in miami than in chicago. the reasons for that increased demand are varied and many, but the short answer to why any place builds more of anything than another place is demand.
 

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sharptent said:
miami is building more high-rises than chicago because their is a greater demand for high-rises in miami than in chicago. the reasons for that increased demand are varied and many, but the short answer to why any place builds more of anything than another place is demand.
Unless, of course, they're building on spec.
 

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Formerly InTheLoop
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Economics baby, economics...
 

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BVictor1 said:
To be honest, i could care less if Miami is building more than Chicago. My concern lies with quality not quantity. I don't think that I'd particularly like something being built in Miami here in Chicago. Yes, we did go through a bad building phase (thank you so very much Mr. Lowenberg), but things have greatly improved as you've seen by some of the recently released design proposals.
Never you worry. We wouldn't dream of building our Miami towers in Chicago. Wouldn't that rather defeat the purpose, which is to build more towers in Miami than are being built in Chicago ? :)
 

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I would imagine that Miami like other relatively "new" sunbelt cities has a higher level of population growth than Chicago. More people = more demand, which these high rises can satisy.

Hope more will be built, so that maybe Miami will extend its subway network.
 

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Chi_Coruscant said:
Miami's high-boom may be skyrocketing at leap-and-bound but may be more vulnerable should the real estate cycle comes to end. Chicago tends to have a nice balance between residential/hotel and office high-rise boom. Hence, there are some serious discussion on office high-rise proposal such as 300 N LaSalle, West Loop area.
When the worst comes, other cities with 100% residential high-rise boom will experience crash more than Chicago (even NYC). IMO
This is a subject of hot debate. And, while time will surely tell, there are not-a-few observers who are very sanguine about Miami's boom. The usual rules may not apply. One very plausible scenario has the boom continuing for quite some time, and then softening, not crashing.
 
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