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Blame it on...
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Does anyone know why much of the Southeast is suffering from a drought? :eek:hno:
 

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Native Flaw-ridian
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A strong La Nina which leads to below average rainfall in the southeast.
Also, there is a persistent area of high pressure that seems to block many of the storms away from the Southeast. If you have noticed lately, most of the rain has been falling in the Midwest and Great Lakes regions of the country. Perhaps we will start to see a rise in the amount of tropical moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, which in turn may help increase the probability for better rainfall chances in the desert Southeast.
 

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Love me, love my dog...
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3. Well below-average rainfall for more than 2 consecutive years = severe drought.

Atlanta average annual rainfall....50.20"
2007 Atlanta rainfall total..........31.85"
2007 rainfall deficit...(18.35")
 

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lagom
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1. High population growth exhausting water supplies

2. Global warming
I have to agree with number 1. on this issue.
The population grows but the size of the rivers, lakes and aquifers remain the same size. Dry weather of course plays a role but over population is a major role player as well. in my opinion.
 

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Love me, love my dog...
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If the region had at least near-normal rainfall, there would be no water shortage. Atlanta is only one area experiencing drought and water issues. There are small towns all over the southeast that have had little to no population growth and are running out of water. Is high population growth still the problem?

The rivers and lakes HAVE NOT stayed the same size. Lake Lanier is the water source for about 3 million people in metro Atlanta. Water at Lake Lanier is normally up to the white part of the marker.

http://projects.ajc.com/gallery/view/metro/addicks1111/

A marker under Lake Lanier Bridge showing the amount of clearance for boats passing underneath it. The normal water level is nowhere near even touching the marker.

http://projects.ajc.com/gallery/view/metro/addicks1111/
 

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lagom
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I'm sorry I meant by SIZE that the capacity remains the same regardless of levels..... you are correct the water levels have not stayed the same obviously..... there's only so much water you can get from a lake or river even at full capacity. I'm sure as water levels return.. if they do... the small populated towns will have little problems with water but it's pretty obvious metro areas consume the most water from lakes and rivers and by the time any of the water flow gets to the areas downstream that can also cause deficit in smaller communites.
 

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Its been raining non-stop here for the last week or so. Some areas in Miami-Dade got as much as 4 or 5 inches in 24 hours the other day.

The rest of Florida has been way below normal the last couple of years (especially Lake Okechoobee) but the Miami area has been above normal. Go figure.
 

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Here in Greenville we are hurting also.....Lake Hartwell looks awful. Grass is starting to turn brown again just like last year.
 

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We have water restrictions in Northeast Columbia. I think the growth is outpacing the cities water system, but i think rain would def help ease them
 

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The Secret Word Is:
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I was in the Lake Lanier area yesterday and saw the official number on their read-out screen. 1056.90 feet around 5PM and 1056.83 feet a few hours later.
 

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You can blame La Nina for the dry conditions in the Southeast. The jet stream is shunted farther to the north during a La Nina, thus keeping most of the rainy weather over the Midwest, Great Lakes, and Northeastern states.
 

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we need a new resevior in Raleigh. Seems to me it gets pretty well depleted looking after a dry week or two. The city council seems to want us to conserve and pay more for our water. There was also a plan to force people who use their own wells to report their water usage. I think it got shot down pretty quick though.
 

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we need a new resevior in Raleigh.
Is anythig being done on this front? I feel the same way, but it seems like everyone thinks that Falls Lake will be sufficient to continue to support Raleigh for decades to come, eventhough our population is booming.

I guess the city leaders are blaming the drought purely on below average rain fall, just like everyone else. :eek:hno:
 

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Hopefully this isn't too far off topic, but it seems drought conditions are also hitting other formerly drought-immune areas.

I live an hour west of Seattle, and hard to believe even Seattle now faces summer droughts.....yes Seattle, a city known far and wide for rain.

Last summer it didn't rain one time from June-Sept. Everyone's grass died. Everything was so dry and un Seattle-like.

When Seattle has droughts you have to look at Global Warming in a serious way for sure.
 
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