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Of all the "southeastern" states, I would have guessed Texas would be at least purple & the most liberal with Houston, Dallas, Austin, San Antonio, El Paso, etc. but it seems like Texas is solid Red as it gets.


North Carolina on the other hand is purple. Similar to Texas in that both are Large states with multiple large Metropolitan areas (Texas is just on a much bigger scale). Does Texas have a large rural population that overshadows metropolitan areas? Are the Lone Star cities red leaning or do they stay a solid blue?

I know in NC, Mecklenburg County/Charlotte stays a consistent blue time and time again. Is Dallas/Houston the same way?


Edit: Meant for the title to be Red, not Read
 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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As with North Carolina, ethnicity plays a large, growing role in Texas politics. Hispanics in Texas are more likely to vote Democrat but their voting participation rates are still weak compared with more conservative anglos. Additionally, an increasing number of hispanics in Texas are more conservative than hispanics in say, California. So while many more of them vote Democrat, enough vote Republican to blunt that overall influence. The largest cities in Texas have solidly Democratic districts many with large numbers of blacks or hispanics while smaller Texas cities tend to have more dispersion or districts that include large rural areas that vote conservatively. Solidly Democratic districts exist along the border but within those latino voting blocks are conservative Democrat or republican voters. So as voter participation grows, expect greater diversity of voting habits as well.
 

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Of all the "southeastern" states, I would have guessed Texas would be at least purple & the most liberal with Houston, Dallas, Austin, San Antonio, El Paso, etc. but it seems like Texas is solid Red as it gets.
I never thought of Texas as a state being anything but Red, at least in recent decades.

Yet as noted, the central cities of Houston, Dallas-Ft Worth & especially San Antonio & Austin do lean Blue. However, the suburbs & rural areas of Texas tend toward Red.
 

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There's simply not enough liberals.... or moderates.

While Texas does have plenty of transplants and an obviously large Hispanic population, the majority white population is very, very conservative .

NC's proximity to the Northeast and the consistent migration from those states, along, with growing diversity helped make it more purple. I think that the state's investment in higher education has helped too. Nothing against Texas, but NC has a strong public university system and has long invested in research.

Texas has a lot of everything, but its growth was linked largely to energy... again not an industry known for progressive causes.

I have to think that trends play out with Texas becoming more middle of the road "purple" but still think it's going to really be a couple decades.
 

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Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
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There's simply not enough liberals.... or moderates.

While Texas does have plenty of transplants and an obviously large Hispanic population, the majority white population is very, very conservative .

NC's proximity to the Northeast and the consistent migration from those states, along, with growing diversity helped make it more purple. I think that the state's investment in higher education has helped too. Nothing against Texas, but NC has a strong public university system and has long invested in research.

Texas has a lot of everything, but its growth was linked largely to energy... again not an industry known for progressive causes.

I have to think that trends play out with Texas becoming more middle of the road "purple" but still think it's going to really be a couple decades.
Texas has a very strong, highly financed university system. Austin owes much of its success and growing tech leadership to UT which has an endowment second only to Harvard's. And it's nonsense to believe that 'progressive' ideas don't thrive in Texas. Texas has the largest windmill farms on earth; it has enormous investments in urban transit systems and leads in many technology applications from green energy to medicine. Whole Foods began in Texas, not Vermont or San Francisco. The old stereotypes persist only because Texas is so large that much of the groundbreaking stuff is overshadowed by the conventional stuff, just as it is in California, New York, or Massachussetts.
 

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Texas has a very strong, highly financed university system. Austin owes much of its success and growing tech leadership to UT which has an endowment second only to Harvard's. And it's nonsense to believe that 'progressive' ideas don't thrive in Texas. Texas has the largest windmill farms on earth; it has enormous investments in urban transit systems and leads in many technology applications from green energy to medicine. Whole Foods began in Texas, not Vermont or San Francisco. The old stereotypes persist only because Texas is so large that much of the groundbreaking stuff is overshadowed by the conventional stuff, just as it is in California, New York, or Massachussetts.
And not only that, Texas is a minority majority state and the major cities and surrounding suburbs are quite diverse.

The thing is that Texas is a much larger state than NC not only by population, but by area as well. There are many red counties in between that sway the votes and the state legislature is Republican on top of that. Demographics plays a big part on who votes and who represents in Texas.

It's not really an apples to apples comparison because Texas is so large and polarized. Liberal enclaves in the middle of the cities are as possible as a conservative suburb in the middle of the panhandle, it's just that one has more influence than the other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Never lived there have you? The policies and general sway of the population is red.
Family in Dallas, Humble, Pasadena, and Kingwood. My sister was born in Houston. My family actually moved to Houston because of the oil boom. Then my Mother moved to Charlote and so did my Grandmother, Great Grandmother, Aunt, Cousins, sister, Nephews, etc. Now I got (close) family all over Metro Charlotte & Houston. Transplants from Pennsylvania & Ohio. Only my sister and I are born from anything south of Ohio in my family.


Anyway, I said "Texas seems as Solid red as it gets". It goes against the typical trend of a Bigger Population being Blue/purple.


I thought maybe With Dallas, Houston, Austin, and San Antonio that they could at least make the Dems competitive. But it seems - based on comments - Texas has a Huge rural population and the 'burbs are pretty conservative also. I compared it to NC because NC seems to be on a similar Ratio to TX. I assumed Dallas/Houston/San Antonio/Austin had as much clout on TX as Charlotte/Raleigh/Greensboro/Winston-Salem had on NC.
 

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Oh No He Didn't
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I thought maybe With Dallas, Houston, Austin, and San Antonio that they could at least make the Dems competitive. But it seems - based on comments - Texas has a Huge rural population and the 'burbs are pretty conservative also. I compared it to NC because NC seems to be on a similar Ratio to TX. I assumed Dallas/Houston/San Antonio/Austin had as much clout on TX as Charlotte/Raleigh/Greensboro/Winston-Salem had on NC.
You just answered your own question.



The rural areas and the suburban areas have a much larger influence over the state then the cities themselves. However the cities of Houston, Dallas, Austin, and San Antonio along with the areas along the Mexican border lean towards the Democratic Party, but you still have limited influence because of the rest of the state still has more influence. It also does not help because of the fact that the Republican Party here have gerrymandered all of the electoral districts here to favor them.
 

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The real question is why white southerners are so red. The answer is obvious: religion. We've all seen this, right?



The next question is why southern conservatism has become so virulent over the last decade or so (I remember deciding not to even watch coverage of the '96 election returns when the networks called Georgia for Clinton as soon as the polls closed). I attribute it to the cumulative effect of years of right wing talk radio, which is especially effective in the suburban south since people here drive way too much and listen to Limbaugh et al while they do it.
 

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Love me, love my dog...
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The real question is why white southerners are so red. The answer is obvious: religion. We've all seen this, right?



The next question is why southern conservatism has become so virulent over the last decade or so (I remember deciding not to even watch coverage of the '96 election returns when the networks called Georgia for Clinton as soon as the polls closed). I attribute it to the cumulative effect of years of right wing talk radio, which is especially effective in the suburban south since people here drive way too much and listen to Limbaugh et al while they do it.
That map is kinda lame...it characterizes several urban areas as conservative and many rural areas as liberal. It's way off.
 

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In Search of Sanity
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The rural areas and the suburban areas have a much larger influence over the state then the cities themselves. However the cities of Houston, Dallas, Austin, and San Antonio along with the areas along the Mexican border lean towards the Democratic Party, but you still have limited influence because of the rest of the state still has more influence. It also does not help because of the fact that the Republican Party here have gerrymandered all of the electoral districts here to favor them.
It remains a serious question. It was recently announced that Texas has become "majority minority". I suspect in Texas that may not mean what it means in California because many Texans with Hispanic surnames whose families have been US citizens for generations are still counted as "minority" but still--it should give the Dems a serious chance statewide. And yet it doesn't seem to. Every single white person in the state must vote Republican (and IMHO they get pretty much what they vote for--lousy schools that teach their kids the earth was created 4000 years ago and no health insurance).
 

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All American City Boy
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It remains a serious question. It was recently announced that Texas has become "majority minority". I suspect in Texas that may not mean what it means in California because many Texans with Hispanic surnames whose families have been US citizens for generations are still counted as "minority" but still--it should give the Dems a serious chance statewide. And yet it doesn't seem to. Every single white person in the state must vote Republican (and IMHO they get pretty much what they vote for--lousy schools that teach their kids the earth was created 4000 years ago and no health insurance).
lousy schools that teach their kids the earth was created 4000 years ago and no health insurance).
Or you're stereotyping an entire state? Amazing what bigots the West can produce. PS, I'm not from Texas, not Christian, and not a Republican. It just gets to me when a blanket is thrown over an entire group of people like that. If someone said absolutely everyone in San Fran was homosexual and would sell their own mother to make a buck, that would also be stereotyping. Don't do that, it just makes you look bad. Last one, Texas has a tendency to score better than California and Arizona in school statistics.
 

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Love me, love my dog...
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Or you're stereotyping an entire state? Amazing what bigots the West can produce. PS, I'm not from Texas, not Christian, and not a Republican. It just gets to me when a blanket is thrown over an entire group of people like that. If someone said absolutely everyone in San Fran was homosexual and would sell their own mother to make a buck, that would also be stereotyping. Don't do that, it just makes you look bad. Last one, Texas has a tendency to score better than California and Arizona in school statistics.
Additionally, I have never met a teacher (I'm a teacher myself) who would actually teach kids that the world was created 4000 years ago. I'm sure there are a few crazies just like in any other profession, but the vast majority are intelligent enough to know the difference between factual information and fantasy - no matter what the state mandates.
 

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Oh No He Didn't
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Every single white person in the state must vote Republican (and IMHO they get pretty much what they vote for--lousy schools that teach their kids the earth was created 4000 years ago and no health insurance).
If you are referring to the Texas Board of Education controversy, it should be noted that most if not all Texans, were against changing the curriculum of the schools, and even most of the Republicans were against it which is why they (including ringleader Don McLeroy) were voted out of office.
 

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There's simply not enough liberals.... or moderates.

While Texas does have plenty of transplants and an obviously large Hispanic population, the majority white population is very, very conservative .

NC's proximity to the Northeast and the consistent migration from those states, along, with growing diversity helped make it more purple. I think that the state's investment in higher education has helped too. Nothing against Texas, but NC has a strong public university system and has long invested in research.

Texas has a lot of everything, but its growth was linked largely to energy... again not an industry known for progressive causes.

I have to think that trends play out with Texas becoming more middle of the road "purple" but still think it's going to really be a couple decades.
Beg your pardon!! So smarter means "progressive"?

As a graduate of UT, I believe I received the best education available anywhere in the country. As the flagship university (sorry to my Aggie friends) of the second most populous state in the country, it is one of the most diverse schools anywhere. Ahem, it's world class. So I must defend my alma mater.

Also, I find that too much is made of Austin being liberal, when it is really more libertarian than leftist. Think Ron Paul supporters. It's one of the many similarities I have found between Austin and Nashville (where the blue dogs rule). And Houston and Dallas have one of the most diverse electorates of all major cities in the country. As opposed to so many other large cities, especially in the northeast and west-coast, where there is only one dominant party running the city's "machine".

But to the point of Texas being "blue", I think you will find that there is an independent streak among Texans that gets adopted by non-natives who move there and stay for any length of time. It's hard for non-Texans to understand, but people there are very no-nonsense. That means they don't put up with a lot of idiotic laws just for the sake of being politically correct. Tradition runs deep in Texas and religion plays a huge part. Plus, the hispanics there are very family oriented and very Catholic. Most of my hispanic friends, acquaintances and family members actually vote Republican most of the time. Like I said, it's a phenomenon that non-Texans find hard to grasp. And remember, many Democrats throughout the south are quite conservative.

Now, I think Texas actually portends changes that will happen in most other areas... and in politics too. Does that mean that the whole country will be purple or red? Not necessarily, but I can attest to the second and third-generation hispanics who are conservatives. I expect that that will happen in many other states too. It's not a given that hispanics automatically vote for liberal Democrats.

Also, it must be pointed out that many of those states that Barack Obama won in 2008 to become president are usually "red", but because of their racial makeup, they went for Obama that year. McCain just wasn't the kind of candidate who would win over many minorities... much less many caucasians.
 

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Or you're stereotyping an entire state? Amazing what bigots the West can produce. PS, I'm not from Texas, not Christian, and not a Republican. It just gets to me when a blanket is thrown over an entire group of people like that. If someone said absolutely everyone in San Fran was homosexual and would sell their own mother to make a buck, that would also be stereotyping. Don't do that, it just makes you look bad. Last one, Texas has a tendency to score better than California and Arizona in school statistics.
Thank you! I wasn't going to get into a "pi--ing" match about state v. state schools... but I can provide much anecdotal evidence that my public (TEXAS) education has prepared me far better than many of my colleagues.

My brother lives in a neighborhood in Richardson, where folks are moving from California, Illinois, New York, Massachusetts, all states where the education systems are reputed to be excellent (across the board). Nearly every week, he hears another parent mention that the schools in Richardson and Plano are better than any school "back home". There is a bit of surprise in their voices, as evidence that they had bought into the stereotype of bad schools in a red state.

Now... this is not to say that property taxes in Texas are low. In fact, by southern standards they're quite high in many places.... but that's really a conservative approach to government (keeping the purse closer to the voters). Many cities in other states (and possibly some states soon) have gone bankrupt from reckless spending. I haven't dug too deeply, but I am not aware of any large Texas city that is on the brink of bankruptcy.
 
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