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It seems like the number of people against Indy grow every day. What is the resentment towards Indianapolis? It wouldnt be so bad if the people who said something negative about Indy would also say something positive to balance. I have certain ideas as to why, but I will hold of on that for now.
 

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because everyone is a fanboy of "their" own town... the ones that try harder or yell louder have to for a reason...

Indy is a nice, pleasant town... and for your buddies in KC... it's nice too...
 

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I don't really think many people hold resentment toward Indianapolis. I certainly don't. That's not to say that I speak for everyone, but with regard to the posts being negative... it's really easy to point out the bad. It's the same thing all over the place - think about the service industry for example. 98% of the time they do a great job but rarely does anyone ever commend them for it. But that last 2%? People are screaming at the top of their lungs.
 

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think about the service industry for example. 98% of the time they do a great job but rarely does anyone ever commend them for it. But that last 2%? People are screaming at the top of their lungs.
Great point. That is precisely why I was happy to see the public feedback posting area of Omaha's daily newspaper online site go away.
 

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The Jive is Alive.
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I don't have anything against Indianapolis. It doesn't really offer the urban environment I look for in cities, but I can still appreciate the city's successes. One thing I have noticed is that forumers from Indy are a classy bunch who really impress me. With people like you guys behind it, I know it's a great town. Seriously, I mean that.
 

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1981 Civic
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
JivecitySTL said:
I don't have anything against Indianapolis. It doesn't really offer the urban environment I look for in cities, but I can still appreciate the city's successes. One thing I have noticed is that forumers from Indy are a classy bunch who really impress me. With people like you guys behind it, I know it's a great town. Seriously, I mean that.
I appreciate those who offer constructive criticism.:)
 

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This sounds like a repeat of the other thread. The people in that thread already gave their reasoning for diss-liking Indianapolis, and almost all of them countered those reasons with positives.

As for myself, other than the lack of urbanity, I think Indy is THE cultural center of Indiana and is going through some exciting times right now. I wish I could be there right now to witness all the excitement.
 

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I travel through Indianapolis at least once a year and have tried to get to know the city as best as I can. My general view of Indy is that the downtown has some of the nicest urban design of any city in the Midwest. Monument Circle provides a great focal point for the city, with easy walks to the Capitol (2 blocks west), Union Station and Circle Center (2-3 blocks south), City Market (2 blocks east), and the library/Scottish Rites monuments (to the north). Its a compact downtown but has nice streetscaping and seems more vibrant now than 5-10 years ago. The Lockerbie Sq. area is also pretty cool.

Outside of downtown, I'm much less impressed. Meridian to the north has some nice homes and Broad Ripple has some interesting restaurants/shops, but much of the rest of the city just looks junky--ugly strip retail and not too impressive looking homes.

What other parts of the city would you recommend that I check out (I'm always willing to adjust my impression based on new and better info).
 

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I love the way Indy is put together. The layout reminds me of DC because of the circle, fountains, monuments, etc. Indy has good restaurants, nice people, & lots of potential. I have a preference for older, grittier cities. But, when I lived in St. Louis, I enjoyed visiting Indy for a change of pace. I have to agree with an earlier post that the forumers from Indy seem to be a decent group, which doesn't surprise me.
 

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I think Indy just needs an national identity. I think that is the problem with most Midwestern cities. I bet you most Americans couldn't tell you one thing about Indy (excluding sports). This is what Midwest cities are suffering from. As Indy grows, I am sure that it will get more attention. For example, if the Arch never existed in St. Louis, what would Americans know about St. Louis? Probably nothing. Americans are very ignorant when it comes to the Midwest.
 

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Historic Neighborhoods in Indianapolis

MplsTodd said:
I travel through Indianapolis at least once a year and have tried to get to know the city as best as I can. My general view of Indy is that the downtown has some of the nicest urban design of any city in the Midwest. Monument Circle provides a great focal point for the city, with easy walks to the Capitol (2 blocks west), Union Station and Circle Center (2-3 blocks south), City Market (2 blocks east), and the library/Scottish Rites monuments (to the north). Its a compact downtown but has nice streetscaping and seems more vibrant now than 5-10 years ago. The Lockerbie Sq. area is also pretty cool.

Outside of downtown, I'm much less impressed. Meridian to the north has some nice homes and Broad Ripple has some interesting restaurants/shops, but much of the rest of the city just looks junky--ugly strip retail and not too impressive looking homes.

What other parts of the city would you recommend that I check out (I'm always willing to adjust my impression based on new and better info).
MplsTodd:

Here is a rundown of many (though, certainly not all) of the historic neighborhoods in Indianapolis:

(1) Downtown:

You stated you already have seen the Lockerbie neighborhood. However, if you have not visited the other historic neighborhoods located within the I-65/I-70 Loop, then you should check out the Chatham Arch neighborhood centered around Massachusetts Ave. located to the northeast of Monument Circle. St. Joseph historic neighborhood is located north of Chatham Arch and a bit to the west, and it contains among its newer buildings a collection of very old homes and rowhouses. Immediately north of the Inner Loop and north of the St. Joseph historic neighborhood is the Old Northside which contains many beautifully restored Victorian homes. Immediately north of the Old Northside is Herron Morton Place which is another neighborhood of beautiful Queen Anne-style homes, and other types of late Victorian-era homes. If you keep going north to about 30th St., you will hit the Meridian Park Historic District, an area of large early twentieth century Arts and Crafts style homes.

(2) Southside

If you go south of the Monument Circle and get on East St. and take it to Virginia Ave., then you will eventually come to Fountain Square, an early dense commercial district on the southside of the city which has most of its buildings dating from the 1870's through the 1930's. In the center of the district is a historic square with a statute in in the middle it, as the name implies. There are also historic homes surrounding the commericial district. Nearby Fletcher Place historic neighborhood is an old residential community dating from the 1850's, and it is located northeast of the Fountain Square area and it has its western boundary along East St. Just south of Fletcher Place and south of Virginia Avenue is the Holy Rosary-Danish Church neighborhood which is one of the old Italian neighborhoods in Indianapolis. The Holy Rosary neighborhood is centered around the Holy Rosary Church at 520 Stevens St. which was constructed from 1911-1925. The parish grounds are home to the Italian Heritage Society of Indiana and the annual Italian Street Festival held in June.

(3) Near Eastside

The Near East Side area consists of various historic neighborhoods, such as Woodruff Place, Arsenal Heights, Holy Cross, Cottage Home, Highland-Brookside, etc. Woodruff Place is a very interesting neighborhood. It was originally a separate town consisting of a planned development of grand homes along boulevards with grassy esplanades containing statuaries. If you go east on New York Street from downtown and then turn north on Hamilton St. and backtrack west a bit on Michigan Street (it's a one-way street), you will find you can turn north onto one of the Woodruff Place Drives. Just west of Woodruff Place on Michigan Street you will find the historic campus of Arsenal Technical High School. The campus was built as a military installation during the Civil War and many of the buildings on the 76-acre campus date from that era. To go back to the beginning of your departure from downtown, if you were to keep going east on New York Street and then turn north on Rural Street you would eventually hit Brookside Parkway which runs along Brookside Park, which was established in 1898, and the surrounding area has many nice historic homes. If you drive east on Washington Street from downtown for about 5 miles to Emerson Ave., you will hit the historic neighborhood of Irvington, which was founded in about 1870 as a separate town and was the original home of Butler University. The western boundary of the area is Arlington Ave. and the northern boundary is roughly formed by Michigan St.

(4) Northside

The northside of Indianapolis is generally the most affluent area of the city, and it has some beautiful historic neighborhoods. If you drive directly north on Meridian St. (the main north-south street) from downtown and cross 38th St. you will hit the North Meridian St. Historic District. (Before you get there, between 16th St. and 38th Street you will notice many historic apartment buildings, mainly from the 1920's, along Meridian Street or just off on the side streets). In the North Meridian St. Historic District, the row of stately mansions with large lawns (most dating from the 1920's and 1930's, with the oldest constructed in 1908 and a handful of newer homes from the 1950's and early 1960's), continues for about two miles until Westfield Boulevard. While you drive up North Meridian Street, you will find to the blocks west of the North Meridian St. District, the historic neighborhood of Butler-Tarkington with most of its homes dating from the 1910's through the 1930's. To the blocks east of the North Meridian St. Historic District, you will find the historic neighborhood of Meridian-Kessler which also has homes dating mostly from the 1910's through the 1930's. Both areas tend to be upper-middle class to fairly wealthy (although the southwestern part of Butler-Tarkington and the southeastern part of Meridian-Kessler are both decidely poorer than the rest of their respective neighborhoods). If you were to drive just a bit north of Westfield Boulevard on North Meridian and then turn west for a few block on Kessler Boulevard, you would be able to turn south off of Kessler onto the gated Sunset Lane into the very exclusive private enclave of Crows Nest (its elegant but rather more modest neighbor, North Crows Nest is located just to the east and north off Kessler along N. Sunset Lane which is not gated). In Crows Nest you would view the neighborhood's collection of very opulent estates (built 1905-1950), which range from 2-20 acres in size. However, the historic district of Crows Nest is closed to the public and patroled by private security (although some people still manage to sneak a peak). You can legally view a (less) exclusive enclave of large and beautiful homes (on substantial but much smaller lots than those of Crows Nest) dating from the same era (1904-1940) if you swing west on 38th Street off of Meridian, and then turn south down Martin Luther King, Jr. St. a few blocks before turning onto Clifton Street and winding back into the hidden enclave of Golden Hill. On the Northeastside, if you shoot back up North Meridian until you hit 56th Street, you can turn east on 56th Street and drive about 6 miles until you can turn off onto Brendon Way South Drive into the Brendonwood Historic District. The neighborhood is a master planned community founded in 1917 and surrounding a residential park. The homes in the neighborhood date from 1917 through the mid-1950's. If you turn around and head west again toward Meridian Street and drive north up Meridian until you hit 79th Street and turn east on Williams Creek Boulevard you will come across the winding streets that twist their way through the estates of the wealthy enclave of Williams Creek. Although it is not technically a historic district, it does have many elegant homes, and some of them date back to the 1920's and 1930's.

(5) Near Westside

The Near Westside has the historic neighborhoods of Haughville, Hawthorne, Stringtown. The most significant of them is the Haughville neighborhood founded in 1883, with many of its homes dating from the 1900's-1930's. At one time it was known as a thriving working-class ethnic neighborhood of Irish and Eastern European immigrants, but now it is a fairly impoverished mostly African-American neighborhood. In recent years, the city has focused a lot of crime prevention and redevelopment efforts on the area. The whole neighborhood is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. You can get to Haughville by heading west on Michigan St. out of downtown, crossing the White River and then turning north on Holmes Ave. The weird and interesting Indiana Medical History Museum is located south of Michigan Street at 3045 West Vermont Street. It is located in the "Old Pathology Building" opened in 1896 on the grounds of the former Central State Hospital for the mentally ill.
 

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chikid said:
I think Indy just needs an national identity. I think that is the problem with most Midwestern cities. I bet you most Americans couldn't tell you one thing about Indy (excluding sports). This is what Midwest cities are suffering from. As Indy grows, I am sure that it will get more attention. For example, if the Arch never existed in St. Louis, what would Americans know about St. Louis? Probably nothing. Americans are very ignorant when it comes to the Midwest.
THAT goes for any city... no one knows whats in phoenix, seattle, portland, jacksonville, tampa, ect! the only stuff people know is sports or vegas or hollywood(la), chicago skyline, ny<<< no one knows city b from city d
 

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^^^right but I think midwest cities suffer the most, or maybe I just say the non-coastal cities. I mean I thought the monument circle was very beautiful in indy, but before I ever saw it i had absoultely no idea they had something like that. What I think is that indy falls in a situation like phoenix or san jose, where it is large and people have absolutely no idea what's there.
 

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KANGAROO1:


Thanks for the info you provided above. I printed out your description of various neighborhoods and will use it next time I drive through Indy (probably in mid-July--my wife grew up in Dayton OH and most of her family lives there).
 

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JivecitySTL said:
I don't have anything against Indianapolis. It doesn't really offer the urban environment I look for in cities, but I can still appreciate the city's successes. One thing I have noticed is that forumers from Indy are a classy bunch who really impress me. With people like you guys behind it, I know it's a great town. Seriously, I mean that.
"No offense to Indianapolis, but Kansas City feels like Paris in comparison. Indianapolis has no soul. They don't call it "Indianoplace" for nothing. Kansas City is oozing with character. I think Indianapolis is a very overrated city. Please don't yell at me now."

-jivecitystl

http://www.kcskyscrapers.com/newforum/index.php?topic=8521.0

jive...ouch.


i know nothing about indy other than it is often compared to kansas city as being approximately similar.
 
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