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Wawaset Park is a neighborhood at the very west of Wilmington, south of Pennsylvania Avenue and east of Greenhill Avenue. The neighborhood was formerly the ground of Schuetzen Park, a horse racing track that later became an auto racing track and site of the Delaware State Fair. The park land was purchased in 1917 by the DuPont Company and a curvilinear street pattern was laid out, modelled after Roland Park in Baltimore. An English-style garden suburb was built soon after.

Wawaset Park was roughly equidistant from DuPont's industrial center at Eleutherian Mills on the Brandywine River and DuPont's headquarters in Downtown Wilmington. The neighborhood was meant to house managers of the DuPont Company who might need to go to either of DuPont's two main sites.





A house on 11th Street.



A house on Ridgeway Road.



A house on 11th Street.



A house on 11th Street.



A house on 11th Street.



A house on 11th Street.



A house on 11th Street.



A house on Greenhill Avenue.



Rowhouses on Blackshire Road.



A house on Saymoure Road.



English-style rowhouses on Crawford Circle.



Rowhouses on Crawford Circle.



English-style rowhouses on Crawford Circle.



A house on Blackshire Road.



Houses on Bedford Court.



Rowhouses on Blackshire Road.



Rowhouses on Nottingham Road.



A house on Nottingham Road.



A house on Macdonough Road.



A house on Saymoure Road.



A duplex on Saymoure Road.



A duplex on Coverdale Road.



A house on Macdonough Road.



Houses on Ridgeway Road.



A house on Blackshire Road.



A house on Riverview Avenue.





Trolley Square is a neighborhood centered around the intersection of Delaware Avenue and DuPont Street. The intersection is the home to several bars and restaurants. To the east, up Delaware Avenue and on its side streets, are various residential buildings, from houses to apartments to highrises.

Trolley Square was first developed in 1864 when Joshua T. Heald bought up the farmland that would become the neighborhood. That same year, he started the Wilmington City Railway Company, which provided passenger trolley service in the city. Horse-drawn trolleys went up Delaware Avenue to the site of the Middle Depot, located at what is now Delaware Avenue and Dupont Street. The accessibility of regular trolley service made the neighborhood desirable, and Delaware Avenue quickly became lined with mansions and large houses, with smaller houses on side streets. A small collection of businesses were located in the area immiediately surrounding the Middle Depot.

Trolley Square was originally called "Happy Valley", which is still the name of a neighborhood east on Delaware Avenue surrounding where I-95 crosses over it and the Brandywine River. In 1978, the Trolley Sqaure Shopping Center was built on the site of the city's abandoned trolley barn at Delaware Avenue and Dupont Street. Over time, the shopping center's name was applied to the surrounding restaurants, bars, and retail establishments, and then was applied to the residential areas to the east.

Today, Trolley Square is Wilmington's main nightlife district, and is the neighborhood of choice for young professionals. The neighborhood is so desirable for young professionals that those who live near the bars of Trolley Square, but west of the railroad tracks in the Forty Acres neighborhood, often claim to live in Trolley Square. This has caused long-time Forty Acres residents to get upset as their neighborhood's identity is eroded. Many old residents of the historic Irish neighborhood are working to preserve their neighborhood's heritage and name before Trolley Square pushes the area into history.





Houses on Pennsylvania Avenue. Pennsylvania Avenue was once considered a desirable street to live on, and the thoroughfare was lined with Queen Anne mansions. These houses are the only remaining houses from that time, and are virtually unrestored. The houses were built in 1880, after streetcar services reached the area.



The Howard Pyle Studios, on Franklin Street. The structure was built in 1883 by Wilmington native Howard Pyle after he returned in 1879 from working in New York City.



Duplexes on Rodney Street.



Houses on Broom Street.



A duplex on Gilpin Avenue.



A house on Franklin Street.



Houses on Lovering Avenue, facing Brandywine Park.



Frank Schoonover Studios, at Rodney Street & Shallcross Avenue. The studio building was built in 1905 by Samuel Bancroft for illustrators that were studying with Howard Pyle.



The first tenants of the studio were Frank E. Schoonover, N. C. Wyeth, Henry Peck, Harvey Dunn, and Clifford Ashley. Over time, Schoonover, who did 2,200 illustrations for magazines and books, as well as over 200 landscapes of the Brandywine and Delaware River valleys, obtained complete ownership of the property.



Catherine Rooney's, on Delaware Avenue. "Rooney's" is an Irish establishment that functions as a pub during the day and a bar at night.



Catharine Rooney's best exemplifies the Irish experience in Trolley Square, beginning with their door for leprechauns at the entrance.



On the side of Catharine Rooney's is a mural advertising Twin Lakes Brewery, a microbrewery located up Pennsylvania Avenue/Kennett Pike in the unincorporated town of Greenville.



C.R. Hooligans, on Delaware Avenue. "Hooligans" is a sports bar that is owned by the same family that owns Catharine Rooney's.



Kelly's Logan House, a bar at Delaware Avenue & Dupont Street, Trolley Square's main intersection. The Logan House was built in 1864 and was named after General John Alexander Logan. The Logan House has been in the Kelly family since 1889.



An old carriage house on Dupont Street behind Kelly's Logan House.



Scratch Magoo's and the Del Rose Cafe, two of Trolley Square's bars. On the right is the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad crossing over Delaware Avenue.



Wilmington's "flatiron building", at Delaware Avenue, Clayton Street, and 16th Street. The structure was built in 1922.



B & O Station once sat where the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad crossed over Delaware Avenue. The station, designed by Frank Furness, was built in 1886 and demolished in 1960. All that remains of the train station today is a sealed-in tunnel which provided passage for people from the station platform on the west side of the tracks down to the station's lobby along Dupont Street.



Houses on Delaware Avenue.



Buildings on Delaware Avenue. The apartment building on the right was built in 1932.



The Henry Siedel House, on Delaware Avenue. The house was built in 1888.



The old Quigley House, on Delaware Avenue. The house is now divided into condominiums.



A duplex on Delaware Avenue.



The Delfe apartment buildings on Delaware Avenue.



Rowhouses on Scott Street.



Rowhouses on Dupont Street.



Duplexes on Shallcross Avenue.



Houses on Broom Street.



The Soldiers & Sailors Monument, at Delaware Avenue, Broom Street, and 14th Street. The memorial was dedicated in 1871 to Civil War veterans. The monument used a column from Benjamin Latrobe's 1801 Bank of Pennsylvania building, which was demolished in 1868 and is considered to be the first example of Greek Revival architecture in the United States.



The Delmar condominium, on Delaware Avenue. The structure was built in 1927.



Houses on Delaware Avenue.



An old house on Delaware Avenue.



Apartment buildings on Delaware Avenue. The buildings are named Milford, Lewes, and Cynwyd, all places either in Delaware or in the Delaware Valley.



Duplexes on Rodney Street.



A house on Broom Street.



St. Stephen's Lutheran Church, on Broom Street. The church was built in 1927.



Westminster Presbyterian Church, at Rodney Street & Pennsylvania Avenue. The church was built in 1911.



Luther Towers, from Pennsylvania Avenue. The residential highrise was built in 1966. In the foreground is a Christopher Columbus statue, in Columbus Triangle. The statue was dedicated in 1957 and was done by Egidio Giaroli, who later was the favorite sculptor of Pope Paul VI.

 
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