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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After WW1, a country like the NL looked at Britain as Germany was not to be trusted and Belgium and France were in ruins.

Here are two very nice "arbeidersbuurten" in Arnhem for which English garden towns stood model. First the Geitenkamp (Camp Goat)





The style of architecture is 'Amsterdamse school' but the planning is very different. These are slopey parts of the city next to the national parks. The last shot is of Vogelwijk. Vogel=bird. Very nice with steep climbs and stairs. Organic suburbia? Romantic? Typically English? I think it's very different from the city planning 'au Corbusier'.

I invite you to post examples of working class areas of similar typology.
 

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i'm always suprised at how English the Dutch suburbs appear to be with those cul de sacs and windy roads and horrid little semis all radiating away from an old and established "high street" (especially in the last pic). seems to be higher density than inter-war and post-war british suburbia tho as many homes have 3 storeys.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Cracovia, the average rent is 500 or 600 euros, lowest probably 300. It's good social housing in a very nice setting, one of the few cities partly built on hills and they're great areas to grow up. Cars can't drive that fast, simply because of these roads. It's prime social democracy. The neighbouring mucipality is the richest of the country. The hills, forests and fields are wonderful and the lower incomes do have a neighbourhood next to it! The people who live in these neighbourhoods got the opportunity through a points awarding system. The longer you've lived in social housing, the more points are accredited to you.

All other neighbourhoods afoot of the hills north of the old city are posh and privately owned.

Johnny, true. Other parts of the city look 'French' by street design. The look of that high street is coincidence. It was planned as a railway track but that never got built. Both types date back to the same period. NL social laws were inspired by their English predecessors and by 1934 or so, the Housing Law became effective with these as the first to be built. I cannot post these shots from a similar neighbourhood in north Amsterdam, as Amsterdam has not been indexed yet :cry: Arguably, these two are the best examples. A manchester architect once explained me that some English housing in its turn was inspired by that neighbourhood in Amsterdam.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oh, they're not representative! They're representative of that era. The Amsterdam neighbourhood mentioned is less leafy and is built in completely flat polders. Social housing in the Netherlands is said to be best; largest rooms, largest toilets, bathrooms etc. Yet the setting is English styled, it opposed to the ideas of Le Corbusier. The street patterns follow the slopes of the hills. In French styling roads would go uphill in a straight line, denying the existing landscape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
In the foreground the Amsterdam neighbourhood Nieuwendam. I found this on flickr.com



In the middle, the regenerated old harbour area and in the backdrop the Diemen suburb of Amsterdam where newly contracted Ajax players get to live.

More of what I found on flickr:



 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm sorry but that's not the point: I'd like to see the influence of social laws on housing, as in the English garden towns. Places where the lower incomes can also enjoy living in shady lanes, and not just the rich.
 
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