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Toronto, Ontario, Canada's most affluent neighbourhoods. It is roughly bounded by Bloor Street to the south, Davenport Road to the north, Yonge Street to the east and Avenue Road to the west.

Founded by entrepreneur Joseph Bloor (after whom Bloor Street, one of Toronto's main thoroughfares, is named) in 1830, the Village of Yorkville began as a residential suburb characterized by Victorian-style homes, quiet residential streets, and picturesque gardens. It was later annexed by the City of Toronto.

In the 1960s, Yorkville flourished as Toronto's bohemian, cultural centre, and was considered by some to be the breeding grounds for some of Canada's most noted musical talents, including Joni Mitchell and Neil Young.

At that time, Yorkville was also known as the Canadian capital of the hippie movement. In 1968, nearby Rochdale College at the University of Toronto was opened on Bloor Street as an experiment in counterculture education.

In the 80s and the 90s, steady gentrification of Yorkville resulted in its current distinctive mix of high-end retail, including many art galleries, fashion boutiques and antique stores, and popular bars, cafes and eateries along Cumberland Street and Yorkville Avenue.

Some of the city's most exclusive retail stores line its streets. Prada, Gucci, Hugo Boss, Chanel, Hermès, Louis Vuitton, Holt Renfrew, Harry Rosen, and many more upscale designer labels can all be found here.

Yorkville is known as a "party central" and an excellent place for people-watching, especially during annual Toronto International Film Festival, which has many locations in and around Yorkville.

Here are some pics!!!
Thanks KGB :)































 

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Toronto and Athens
ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ
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Amazing pictures CKID!

I, too, often go to the Yorkville area for drinks. In the summer, not many places beat it.
 

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CKID said:
Toronto, Ontario, Canada's most affluent neighbourhoods. It is roughly bounded by Bloor Street to the south, Davenport Road to the north, Yonge Street to the east and Avenue Road to the west.

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I liked all your photos, showing people actually enjoying life in the city. A lot more meaningful really that some of the photos of skylines taken from an airplane.

This picture in particular I wanted to comment on. The building is clearly apartments, but there are no balconies, at least on the front street. Also, there is no setback for landscaping, perhaps because the bottom two floors are commercial.

For me, it's the right height at about 10 storeys, and an appropriately wide, block long dimension. I do think that residential structures should have landscaping, perhaps 15 to 20 feet or so in front to distinguish them from office/commercial precincts. This is one of the secrets of success in the older West End of Vancouver, a lesson that a City Council too easily influenced by developers and realtors, totally abandoned in planning Yaletown, where the structures go right to the sidewalk, albeit a widened sidewalk. Some think it looks more urban, but pure urban and residential aren't quite the same.

It's an appealing looking building in your photo though some don't like the post-modern look. Is there a similar building somewhere on a nearby street with landscape setbacks?
 

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The building is on Avenue Road...a major commercial street....commercial streets generally don't have setbacks...residential streets do.






KGB
 

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Excellent pics CKID, you represent Toronto well. You've chosen a variety of subject manner, and you have a good eye. It's refreshing to see different parts of TO showcased on SSC.
 

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"Remember elkram, KGB? I think he is back.."



The name kinda rings a bell, but other than that, I have no idea who he was. Should I be afraid??? he he






KGB
 

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KGB said:
The building is on Avenue Road...a major commercial street....commercial streets generally don't have setbacks...residential streets do.
A choice I wouldn't argue with, especially if the building itself has commercial activity on the first few levels. In the Vancouver Yaletown example, however, some of the streets that have new apartments has no real commercial activity left, and could have been reconfigured to a more residential look. That they weren't looks to me like developer interests coming first.

I wonder why there are no balconies on the building in the photo, perhaps because it overlooks a busy street and the porches would not be used if they were available?
 

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Smelser said:
A choice I wouldn't argue with, especially if the building itself has commercial activity on the first few levels. In the Vancouver Yaletown example, however, some of the streets that have new apartments has no real commercial activity left, and could have been reconfigured to a more residential look. That they weren't looks to me like developer interests coming first.

I wonder why there are no balconies on the building in the photo, perhaps because it overlooks a busy street and the porches would not be used if they were available?
What you see in that shot is more or less the podium of a taller building... you can see the full hieght of that portion in the top left corner of the pic. The tower above it rises... i dunno, 40 floors I guess, and those units have balconies. Typically podiums don't have balconies, at least in TO, for a variety of reasons. Aesthetic appeal, massing, busy street, etc, etc... take your pick.
 
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