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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems to me that most major cities have a certain distinctive style or styles of housing that set that city apart. These styles are easily recognizable not only as being from a specific country, but as being from that specific city. In this thread you can post pictures of the distinctive styles of housing that your city has developed- housing that would be easily recognizable in a picture as your city. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Here in Baltimore, USA the main feature of the urban landscape is row houses. Some of the distinctive row house styles that we have developed here in Baltimore include:
The swell-front row house, as seen here in the Hampden neighborhood:


The most ubiquitous row house in the city, however, and the one that most represents Baltimore is the green-tiled overhang with porch. These can be seen in almost every neighborhood; these are in Coldstream:

Baltimoreans in many neighborhoods, particularly south and east of the CBD, have adopted the unique practice of building rooftop decks on top of their row houses:


Finally, we have adopted the practice of covering old brick row houses in fake stone called formstone. I haven't seen this anywhere except Baltimore:

 

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Mexico City must be these kind of XIXcentury combined with art deco in Roma and Condesa neighbourhoods

Colonia Roma y Colonia Condesa, Ciudad de México








Las calles de la colonia roma, a mi parecer son románticas.













Algunas casas de Obregón están siendo restauradas y usadas como oficinas o restaurantes.


El camellon de esta avenida se encuentra engalanado con hermosas esculturas y fuentes.



























Esta hermosa construcción ahora es un centro cultural denominado Casa Lam, originalmente fue las oficinas de urbanización de la colonia, ahí iba uno y elegía el lote que quisiera comprar.






Eso es todo por el momento pero me falta la mitad de fotos por subir, cuando tenga tiempo lo haré, gracias por sus comentarios.


Continuando me desvíe hacia el sur, a un jardín hermoso, creo que se llama plaza Orizaba, no estoy seguro, siempre la había conocido de noche ya que en ella se ubicaba una disco gay muy chida pero la verdad cuando llegaba no me fijaba mucho en ella.




































El domingo estaba viendo la TV cuando pasaron en el canal 11 un programa sobre la colonia roma, y hablaron de la romita, el pueblo original que se ubicaba al oriente de la colonia y quedo inmerso en ella, es bien raro ya que pues el estilo afrancesado de la colonia contrasta intensamente con estas cuadritas con trazo y arquitectura diferente, se encuentra ahí una iglesia colonial una verdadera joya.





[/QUOTE]
 

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Picture from SSC member Bahnsteig4

Thats an example of nice looking and well maintained buildings which are from the "Gründerzeit", ie late 19th century/beginning of the 20th century. Vienna is full of them, even if a many are in a worse state and many have been robbed of their exterior beauty and feature plain wal nowadays.

This photo shows one of the historical outer suburbs btw., in the 18th district. The historical inner suburbs feature one or two floors more
 

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Copenhagen's 3 most typical styles..

14-1600s


1700-1900s


1850s-1950s..


Pretty much a natural evolution starting from around 1400 where fire risk made old tudor a tad too risky ( as we learned trough a couple bad fires )
 

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Queenslander architecture is a modern term for the vernacular type of architecture of Queensland, Australia. It is also found in the northern parts of the adjacent state of New South Wales and shares many traits with architecture in other states of Australia but is distinct and unique. The type developed in the 1840s and is still constructed today, displaying an evolution of local style. The term is primarily applied to residential construction, although some commercial and other types of construction are identified as Queenslander.






The Queenslander, a "type" not a "style", is defined primarily by architectural characteristics of climate-consideration. They have been constructed in the popular styles of the time including, but not limited to colonial, Victorian, Federation, Arts and Crafts/Art Nouveau, Interwar styles, and Post-WWII styles. The Queenslander is popularly thought of as an "old" house although Queenslanders are constructed today using modern styles as well as "reproductions" of previous styles.
:)
 

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Helsinki

City centre: 19th century/Jugend buildings







Inner city areas: Jugend, 20s classicism, functionalist buildings







Suburbs: tower blocks, modern apartment buildings, detached and semi- detached houses, some old villa areas.













 

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Singapore's traditional typology, the Shophouse. Blend of styles from Western, Chinese, Indian, Malay architecture.

Shopfront on the ground level and residential upstairs. Feature of this architecture is the "five foot way" covered walkway at street level, very narrow frontage but deep plots and courtyards

Once treated as slums and many entire districts were torn down en masse in the 1970s, the remaining are mostly conserved by the authorities

















In the 1930s, shophouse-apartments started to appear. A new typology. Shops on ground level, apartments upstairs.





 

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It's annoying, but many of us have to accept that in our cities, most people do not live in 'distinctive housing'. In many European cities, 'distinctive' housing is generally a folkloric city-center kind of thing, but far from having a big impact on the urban fabric of the city.
 

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It's annoying, but many of us have to accept that in our cities, most people do not live in 'distinctive housing'. In many European cities, 'distinctive' housing is generally a folkloric city-center kind of thing, but far from having a big impact on the urban fabric of the city.
Perhaps, but these "distinctive" areas are what most people associate with their cities, not the suburbs and "planned areas" around them. I'd say its all down to density. In European cities it's these older "distinctive" areas that generate more city diversity and culture than the sprawl beyond.
 

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I agree. Here is a typical street in Marseille's oldest district (le Panier). Although none of the houses are identical, as in a typical terraced housing street, they all share a certain style (generally 3 floors, stone masonry covered in painted plaster, two windows wide, red tiled roofs etc.).

The pic isn't perfect in this aspect but hopefully shows enough (pic from wikipedia).

 

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This image alone shows the typical residential blocks in HK both mid-rise and high-rise.

By H.L. Tam
 

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Vancouver has a lot of these and they call them "Vancouver Specials" basically houses that use as much of the lot as possible with rooms/suites to rent out sometimes or for large families

they try to vary the look of them but they are all ugly and usually identifiable to what era they were built i what finishes were trendy

3 different eras side by side


















recently they have been more appreciated and given makeovers and architects really like working with them
before and after


 

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Here in Baltimore, USA the main feature of the urban landscape is row houses. Some of the distinctive row house styles that we have developed here in Baltimore include:
The swell-front row house, as seen here in the Hampden neighborhood:


The most ubiquitous row house in the city, however, and the one that most represents Baltimore is the green-tiled overhang with porch. These can be seen in almost every neighborhood; these are in Coldstream:

Baltimoreans in many neighborhoods, particularly south and east of the CBD, have adopted the unique practice of building rooftop decks on top of their row houses:


Finally, we have adopted the practice of covering old brick row houses in fake stone called formstone. I haven't seen this anywhere except Baltimore:


Great pictures!

IMO, the overwhelming predominance of solid, brick rowhouse throughout Baltimore is what really makes the city seem more urban & larger than it really is.

Baltimore has certainly suffered its share of population loss. But its hard to tell given the dense fabric of rowhouses

Brick cities are built to last!
 

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Many of us must accept that in our cities, most people do not live in homes distinctive. In many European cities, character housing is usually some sort of center folk thing, but far from having a major impact on urban structure city.In European cities, it is the old unusual areas that generate a greater diversity in urban and cultural dissemination outside.
 

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Morro da Conceição is a residential area near the downtown of Rio de Janeiro that managed to keep it's "discinctive" look and at the same time avoid gentrification, althought i don't know for how long.









 

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in la, there are a lot of little old apartment complexes from the 20s and 30s. they're usually long and skinny, but are never connected



many of them look like large single family houses from the front



there are also a lot of spanish style homes



you also see a lot of "california bungalows" from around the same time period, but i'm too lazy to find pictures.
 
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